topic
Here's to Good Health

Introduced: January 12 2015

Remember when your mother said, "An apple a day..."? Turns out she was right. We asked IWD members to send in practical information and suggestions -- and they responded. Here are some new ideas to improve your own health.

Dialogue on Here's to Good Health
IWD:

Note from IWD: If you knew the IWD member who sent in this list of supplements she's researched, you would be able to see that this routine is working really well for her. We requested that she share her secrets and here's what she told us:

 

Protandin: signals your body's genes to produce special antioxidant enzymes to fight oxidative stress

 

Co Q-10: Coenzyme Q10 is a powerful antioxidant that may prevent premature aging, boost immunity and treat certain types of cancer.

 

Astaxanthin: This algae-based antioxidant has been shown to be a very effective remedy for all types of tendon, joint and muscle pain, arthritis and tennis elbow. It's also a great nutritional supplement for beautiful skin and it may be the best one to take for your eyesight as well.

 

Krill Oil: protect your heart, lower your cholesterol, fight PMS symptoms, combat inflammation, optimize your brain's capabilities, fight aging AND boost your overall health and wellbeing!

 

Resveratrol: Resveratrol is an anti-inflammatory, increases energy levels, lowers blood sugar and extends life. These are not outrageous claims -- they are clinically studied and tested benefits of resveratrol.

 

Juvenon: (Dr. Weil) an award-winning team of University scientists discovered that by using the right combination of a natural, energy-boosting component (acetyl L-carnitine) and a powerful antioxidant (alpha-lipoic acid) they could maintain the health of mitochondria, effectively slowing the cellular aging process.*

 

Some of the other more well-known things that I take are: Vitamin D3 10,000 units a week B12 Fish Oil Vemma (Vitamin and Antioxidant Supplement liguid)

051:

Well, on the subject of healthy eating, I just want to give a shout out for kale. A few years ago, I would have turned up my nose at the suggestion. If forced, I would have sauteed it with onion and garlic and 'suffered' through it because it was 'good for me'. Now a days, I can NOT get enough. Kale is high in fiber, low in calories and zero fat, high in iron, filled with powerful antioxidants, high in vitamin K (prevents blood clots and aides in bone health and powerful cancer preventative, Vitamins A&C, Calcium (per calorie....more calcium than MILK!), as well as cardiovascular support (eating kale can lower your cholesterol!). And, after coming up with some fun recipes for kale salads with dijon vinaigrette or mini veggie frittata's, I look forward to my next meal involving kale. A total green powerhouse!

IWD:

Before we get to the great tips sent in by IWD members -- and this is just the beginning, there are more to come -- we wanted to tell you why mom was right about apples. Here's an article on 15 ways eating apples makes you healthier. Even if half of them are true, that still makes your mom a genius. http://www.besthealthmag.ca/eat-well/nutrition/15-health-benefits-of-eating-apples

We're still collecting good ideas, so click "Comment" and tell us yours.

222:

My current favorite beauty product is a little vial of “Vitamin C Serum” made by MyChelle.

 

Note from IWD: Here's what we found about Vitamin C and how it is reported to benefit skin. (This information comes from http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/information/nutrition/vitamin-c-benefit-skin.htm

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, aids the production of collagen, a protein that aids in the growth of cells and blood vessels and gives skin its firmness and strength.

"Vitamin C is an antioxidant that slows the rate of free-radical damage -- free radicals are unstable molecules that damage collagen and cause skin dryness, fine lines and wrinkles. New research shows that ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, a derivative of vitamin C, not only neutralizes free radicals, but also reverses DNA damage [source: University of Leicester]."

"Research suggests that vitamin C may also reduce sunburn caused by exposure to ultraviolet B radiation and prevent the consequences of long-term sun exposure, which can lead to skin cancer [sources: University of Maryland Medical Center, Bouchez]. This doesn't mean you can take vitamins or apply topical vitamin C and then bake safely in the sun, but you can help keep your skin healthy and supple by making sure you get enough of this antioxidant vitamin [source: Bouchez]."

1933:

I have always been suspicious of “diets” aimed only at losing weight. I’m much more interested in a “way to eat” that is healthy and sustainable. Now I’m really happy to have landed on the Mediterranean Diet, where you don’t have to count anything, you just choose the same foods that people have traditionally eaten in Greece, Italy, Spain, etc. The mainstay is vegetables, fruits, nuts and fish.

 

Note from IWD: To find out more about the Mediterranean approach to nutrition, there is a great web site that captures the essence of this plan, which is as much about lifestyle as it is about food. http://oldwayspt.org/programs/mediterranean-foods-alliance

321:

In the area of making sure to have a healthy mind -- after reading all the buzz about online courses, I decided to jump in. I don’t really see it as a substitute for sitting in a classroom with other students, which, to me, is much more stimulating, but is a great way to gain access to information and knowledge you otherwise wouldn’t have.

 

Note from IWD: One of the major players in online classes is Coursera, which was started by two Stanford computer science professors. https://www.coursera.org/about/howitworks

Since its creation and after experiencing amazingly rapid growth, Coursera currently offers 335 courses from 62 universities in 16 countries – and has more than 3 million “students.” This is not a recommendation because we haven’t actually taken a course from Coursera, but if returning to learning appeals to you, probably worth checking out. If any of you have had a good or not so good experience with Coursera, lets us know. 

IWD:

Note from IWD: If you knew the IWD member who sent in this list of supplements she's researched, you would be able to see that this routine is working really well for her. We requested that she share her secrets and here's what she told us:

 

Protandin: signals your body's genes to produce special antioxidant enzymes to fight oxidative stress

 

Co Q-10: Coenzyme Q10 is a powerful antioxidant that may prevent premature aging, boost immunity and treat certain types of cancer.

 

Astaxanthin: This algae-based antioxidant has been shown to be a very effective remedy for all types of tendon, joint and muscle pain, arthritis and tennis elbow. It's also a great nutritional supplement for beautiful skin and it may be the best one to take for your eyesight as well.

 

Krill Oil: protect your heart, lower your cholesterol, fight PMS symptoms, combat inflammation, optimize your brain's capabilities, fight aging AND boost your overall health and wellbeing!

 

Resveratrol: Resveratrol is an anti-inflammatory, increases energy levels, lowers blood sugar and extends life. These are not outrageous claims -- they are clinically studied and tested benefits of resveratrol.

 

Juvenon: (Dr. Weil) an award-winning team of University scientists discovered that by using the right combination of a natural, energy-boosting component (acetyl L-carnitine) and a powerful antioxidant (alpha-lipoic acid) they could maintain the health of mitochondria, effectively slowing the cellular aging process.*

 

Some of the other more well-known things that I take are: Vitamin D3 10,000 units a week B12 Fish Oil Vemma (Vitamin and Antioxidant Supplement liguid)

051:

Well, on the subject of healthy eating, I just want to give a shout out for kale. A few years ago, I would have turned up my nose at the suggestion. If forced, I would have sauteed it with onion and garlic and 'suffered' through it because it was 'good for me'. Now a days, I can NOT get enough. Kale is high in fiber, low in calories and zero fat, high in iron, filled with powerful antioxidants, high in vitamin K (prevents blood clots and aides in bone health and powerful cancer preventative, Vitamins A&C, Calcium (per calorie....more calcium than MILK!), as well as cardiovascular support (eating kale can lower your cholesterol!). And, after coming up with some fun recipes for kale salads with dijon vinaigrette or mini veggie frittata's, I look forward to my next meal involving kale. A total green powerhouse!

IWD:

Before we get to the great tips sent in by IWD members -- and this is just the beginning, there are more to come -- we wanted to tell you why mom was right about apples. Here's an article on 15 ways eating apples makes you healthier. Even if half of them are true, that still makes your mom a genius. http://www.besthealthmag.ca/eat-well/nutrition/15-health-benefits-of-eating-apples

We're still collecting good ideas, so click "Comment" and tell us yours.

222:

My current favorite beauty product is a little vial of “Vitamin C Serum” made by MyChelle.

 

Note from IWD: Here's what we found about Vitamin C and how it is reported to benefit skin. (This information comes from http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/information/nutrition/vitamin-c-benefit-skin.htm

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, aids the production of collagen, a protein that aids in the growth of cells and blood vessels and gives skin its firmness and strength.

"Vitamin C is an antioxidant that slows the rate of free-radical damage -- free radicals are unstable molecules that damage collagen and cause skin dryness, fine lines and wrinkles. New research shows that ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, a derivative of vitamin C, not only neutralizes free radicals, but also reverses DNA damage [source: University of Leicester]."

"Research suggests that vitamin C may also reduce sunburn caused by exposure to ultraviolet B radiation and prevent the consequences of long-term sun exposure, which can lead to skin cancer [sources: University of Maryland Medical Center, Bouchez]. This doesn't mean you can take vitamins or apply topical vitamin C and then bake safely in the sun, but you can help keep your skin healthy and supple by making sure you get enough of this antioxidant vitamin [source: Bouchez]."

1933:

I have always been suspicious of “diets” aimed only at losing weight. I’m much more interested in a “way to eat” that is healthy and sustainable. Now I’m really happy to have landed on the Mediterranean Diet, where you don’t have to count anything, you just choose the same foods that people have traditionally eaten in Greece, Italy, Spain, etc. The mainstay is vegetables, fruits, nuts and fish.

 

Note from IWD: To find out more about the Mediterranean approach to nutrition, there is a great web site that captures the essence of this plan, which is as much about lifestyle as it is about food. http://oldwayspt.org/programs/mediterranean-foods-alliance

321:

In the area of making sure to have a healthy mind -- after reading all the buzz about online courses, I decided to jump in. I don’t really see it as a substitute for sitting in a classroom with other students, which, to me, is much more stimulating, but is a great way to gain access to information and knowledge you otherwise wouldn’t have.

 

Note from IWD: One of the major players in online classes is Coursera, which was started by two Stanford computer science professors. https://www.coursera.org/about/howitworks

Since its creation and after experiencing amazingly rapid growth, Coursera currently offers 335 courses from 62 universities in 16 countries – and has more than 3 million “students.” This is not a recommendation because we haven’t actually taken a course from Coursera, but if returning to learning appeals to you, probably worth checking out. If any of you have had a good or not so good experience with Coursera, lets us know. 

321:

In the area of making sure to have a healthy mind -- after reading all the buzz about online courses, I decided to jump in. I don’t really see it as a substitute for sitting in a classroom with other students, which, to me, is much more stimulating, but is a great way to gain access to information and knowledge you otherwise wouldn’t have.

 

Note from IWD: One of the major players in online classes is Coursera, which was started by two Stanford computer science professors. https://www.coursera.org/about/howitworks

Since its creation and after experiencing amazingly rapid growth, Coursera currently offers 335 courses from 62 universities in 16 countries – and has more than 3 million “students.” This is not a recommendation because we haven’t actually taken a course from Coursera, but if returning to learning appeals to you, probably worth checking out. If any of you have had a good or not so good experience with Coursera, lets us know. 

1933:

I have always been suspicious of “diets” aimed only at losing weight. I’m much more interested in a “way to eat” that is healthy and sustainable. Now I’m really happy to have landed on the Mediterranean Diet, where you don’t have to count anything, you just choose the same foods that people have traditionally eaten in Greece, Italy, Spain, etc. The mainstay is vegetables, fruits, nuts and fish.

 

Note from IWD: To find out more about the Mediterranean approach to nutrition, there is a great web site that captures the essence of this plan, which is as much about lifestyle as it is about food. http://oldwayspt.org/programs/mediterranean-foods-alliance

222:

My current favorite beauty product is a little vial of “Vitamin C Serum” made by MyChelle.

 

Note from IWD: Here's what we found about Vitamin C and how it is reported to benefit skin. (This information comes from http://health.howstuffworks.com/skin-care/information/nutrition/vitamin-c-benefit-skin.htm

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, aids the production of collagen, a protein that aids in the growth of cells and blood vessels and gives skin its firmness and strength.

"Vitamin C is an antioxidant that slows the rate of free-radical damage -- free radicals are unstable molecules that damage collagen and cause skin dryness, fine lines and wrinkles. New research shows that ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, a derivative of vitamin C, not only neutralizes free radicals, but also reverses DNA damage [source: University of Leicester]."

"Research suggests that vitamin C may also reduce sunburn caused by exposure to ultraviolet B radiation and prevent the consequences of long-term sun exposure, which can lead to skin cancer [sources: University of Maryland Medical Center, Bouchez]. This doesn't mean you can take vitamins or apply topical vitamin C and then bake safely in the sun, but you can help keep your skin healthy and supple by making sure you get enough of this antioxidant vitamin [source: Bouchez]."

IWD:

Before we get to the great tips sent in by IWD members -- and this is just the beginning, there are more to come -- we wanted to tell you why mom was right about apples. Here's an article on 15 ways eating apples makes you healthier. Even if half of them are true, that still makes your mom a genius. http://www.besthealthmag.ca/eat-well/nutrition/15-health-benefits-of-eating-apples

We're still collecting good ideas, so click "Comment" and tell us yours.

051:

Well, on the subject of healthy eating, I just want to give a shout out for kale. A few years ago, I would have turned up my nose at the suggestion. If forced, I would have sauteed it with onion and garlic and 'suffered' through it because it was 'good for me'. Now a days, I can NOT get enough. Kale is high in fiber, low in calories and zero fat, high in iron, filled with powerful antioxidants, high in vitamin K (prevents blood clots and aides in bone health and powerful cancer preventative, Vitamins A&C, Calcium (per calorie....more calcium than MILK!), as well as cardiovascular support (eating kale can lower your cholesterol!). And, after coming up with some fun recipes for kale salads with dijon vinaigrette or mini veggie frittata's, I look forward to my next meal involving kale. A total green powerhouse!

IWD:

Note from IWD: If you knew the IWD member who sent in this list of supplements she's researched, you would be able to see that this routine is working really well for her. We requested that she share her secrets and here's what she told us:

 

Protandin: signals your body's genes to produce special antioxidant enzymes to fight oxidative stress

 

Co Q-10: Coenzyme Q10 is a powerful antioxidant that may prevent premature aging, boost immunity and treat certain types of cancer.

 

Astaxanthin: This algae-based antioxidant has been shown to be a very effective remedy for all types of tendon, joint and muscle pain, arthritis and tennis elbow. It's also a great nutritional supplement for beautiful skin and it may be the best one to take for your eyesight as well.

 

Krill Oil: protect your heart, lower your cholesterol, fight PMS symptoms, combat inflammation, optimize your brain's capabilities, fight aging AND boost your overall health and wellbeing!

 

Resveratrol: Resveratrol is an anti-inflammatory, increases energy levels, lowers blood sugar and extends life. These are not outrageous claims -- they are clinically studied and tested benefits of resveratrol.

 

Juvenon: (Dr. Weil) an award-winning team of University scientists discovered that by using the right combination of a natural, energy-boosting component (acetyl L-carnitine) and a powerful antioxidant (alpha-lipoic acid) they could maintain the health of mitochondria, effectively slowing the cellular aging process.*

 

Some of the other more well-known things that I take are: Vitamin D3 10,000 units a week B12 Fish Oil Vemma (Vitamin and Antioxidant Supplement liguid)

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