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The Late Great Focus on Foreign Policy

Introduced: October 22 2012

Isn't it curious, after a year-long general consensus that the number one issue for voters is the economy -- that the neck-and-neck race might come down to a last debate on foreign policy? Tune in and give IWD your opinion: What's the most important foreign policy issue facing America today -- and who's best equipped to handle the challenges?

Dialogue on The Late Great Focus on Foreign Policy
536:

Because the candidates were vague about identifying what they think our main foreign policy issues are, I did a little searching and found this report by NBC News about the top 10 foreign policy issues the New President will face: http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/10/22/14613799-top-10-foreign-policy-issues-facing-a-new-president?lite

Note from IWD: We appreciate member 536 alerting us to this article, because it seems a good list. A preview of the 10 challenges they chose:

Possible Afghan collapse/civil war

Possible Iran implosion or explosion

Rise of the Muslim Brotherhood

Cyber threat

Israeli strike on Iran

Revival of al-Qaida/Ansar al-Sharia

Rift with Pakistan

Mexico and the Growing Drug War

U.S. Pivot to Asia/China Slowdown

United States Drifting? (Has fighting terrorism has become our only “foreign policy?”)

148:

I'm of the same mind as Mayor Bloomberg of New York -- disappointed with both candidates because all we get is one-liners and phrases. Neither candidate has an economic plan to solve our deep financial issues; neither will take on the NRA regarding assault weapons; fully express their ideas regarding gay marriage; a women's right to choose; and the long term solutions to climate change and many other important issues facing our country. And now tonight we will listen to the debate regarding foreign policy. Romney will spend the entire evening trying to embarrass the President about the lax security in Libya and Obama will try and show that Romney has no experience with foreign policy... welcome to London. I HAVE AN IDEA!...is it possible to have the two candidates engage in a DIALOGUE about what is best for the U.S. instead of what is wrong with each other?...wishful thinking on my part.

352:

The reality of the economy is still of utmost importance to most Americans. If not for this incredible bungling, mishandling or outright deception regarding the Libyan matter, we may not have known the level of competency the current administration posseses in this crucial area of responsibility.

060:

Following the debate, many people remarked that both candidates were too quick to switch the discussion back to domestic issues and the economy. But I think there is a strong connection between America's traditional leadership role in the world and the vibrancy of our economy. We also need to realize that our economy is affected greatly by the economic conditions of other nations. Unless we solve our problems, lower our deficit and get back on track, our role as the world's "only superpower" will be at risk. It's not just our ideals that make us super; it's the resources we have at our disposal to address the world's problems.

Note from IWD: An article in Bloomberg Business Week expresses much the same point of view, with the author Romesh Ratnesar saying, “…the most critical national security test facing the next president isn’t terrorism, which Obama picked during the Oct. 22 debate; or Iran, as Romney said. Focus instead on the $16.2 trillion national debt, more than 33 percent of which is foreign-owned, with China alone holding $1.15 trillion.” Read more: http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-10-24/theres-nothing-foreign-about-foreign-policy#r=hp-ls

264:

As with the other debates, I found the "HOW" was missing in both candidates' answers about foreign policy. Of course, it makes sense to pronounce that America must make sure that leaders who come to power in Middle Eastern countries are reasonable people and not radical -- but how are we going to do that? My guess is that President Obama and his administration are addressing that objective but in ways you would never, ever hear discussed in public.

223:

The last debate taught me two things: 1) Romney is probably smart enough and strong enough to be a very good leader and commander-in-chief and 2) Until a person has actually functioned in that role, it is naive to think he/she could do a better job. Those of us on the outside -- even people who are considered credible candidates for the role of President -- have NO IDEA what's going on behind the scenes.

536:

Because the candidates were vague about identifying what they think our main foreign policy issues are, I did a little searching and found this report by NBC News about the top 10 foreign policy issues the New President will face: http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/10/22/14613799-top-10-foreign-policy-issues-facing-a-new-president?lite

Note from IWD: We appreciate member 536 alerting us to this article, because it seems a good list. A preview of the 10 challenges they chose:

Possible Afghan collapse/civil war

Possible Iran implosion or explosion

Rise of the Muslim Brotherhood

Cyber threat

Israeli strike on Iran

Revival of al-Qaida/Ansar al-Sharia

Rift with Pakistan

Mexico and the Growing Drug War

U.S. Pivot to Asia/China Slowdown

United States Drifting? (Has fighting terrorism has become our only “foreign policy?”)

148:

I'm of the same mind as Mayor Bloomberg of New York -- disappointed with both candidates because all we get is one-liners and phrases. Neither candidate has an economic plan to solve our deep financial issues; neither will take on the NRA regarding assault weapons; fully express their ideas regarding gay marriage; a women's right to choose; and the long term solutions to climate change and many other important issues facing our country. And now tonight we will listen to the debate regarding foreign policy. Romney will spend the entire evening trying to embarrass the President about the lax security in Libya and Obama will try and show that Romney has no experience with foreign policy... welcome to London. I HAVE AN IDEA!...is it possible to have the two candidates engage in a DIALOGUE about what is best for the U.S. instead of what is wrong with each other?...wishful thinking on my part.

352:

The reality of the economy is still of utmost importance to most Americans. If not for this incredible bungling, mishandling or outright deception regarding the Libyan matter, we may not have known the level of competency the current administration posseses in this crucial area of responsibility.

060:

Following the debate, many people remarked that both candidates were too quick to switch the discussion back to domestic issues and the economy. But I think there is a strong connection between America's traditional leadership role in the world and the vibrancy of our economy. We also need to realize that our economy is affected greatly by the economic conditions of other nations. Unless we solve our problems, lower our deficit and get back on track, our role as the world's "only superpower" will be at risk. It's not just our ideals that make us super; it's the resources we have at our disposal to address the world's problems.

Note from IWD: An article in Bloomberg Business Week expresses much the same point of view, with the author Romesh Ratnesar saying, “…the most critical national security test facing the next president isn’t terrorism, which Obama picked during the Oct. 22 debate; or Iran, as Romney said. Focus instead on the $16.2 trillion national debt, more than 33 percent of which is foreign-owned, with China alone holding $1.15 trillion.” Read more: http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-10-24/theres-nothing-foreign-about-foreign-policy#r=hp-ls

264:

As with the other debates, I found the "HOW" was missing in both candidates' answers about foreign policy. Of course, it makes sense to pronounce that America must make sure that leaders who come to power in Middle Eastern countries are reasonable people and not radical -- but how are we going to do that? My guess is that President Obama and his administration are addressing that objective but in ways you would never, ever hear discussed in public.

223:

The last debate taught me two things: 1) Romney is probably smart enough and strong enough to be a very good leader and commander-in-chief and 2) Until a person has actually functioned in that role, it is naive to think he/she could do a better job. Those of us on the outside -- even people who are considered credible candidates for the role of President -- have NO IDEA what's going on behind the scenes.

223:

The last debate taught me two things: 1) Romney is probably smart enough and strong enough to be a very good leader and commander-in-chief and 2) Until a person has actually functioned in that role, it is naive to think he/she could do a better job. Those of us on the outside -- even people who are considered credible candidates for the role of President -- have NO IDEA what's going on behind the scenes.

264:

As with the other debates, I found the "HOW" was missing in both candidates' answers about foreign policy. Of course, it makes sense to pronounce that America must make sure that leaders who come to power in Middle Eastern countries are reasonable people and not radical -- but how are we going to do that? My guess is that President Obama and his administration are addressing that objective but in ways you would never, ever hear discussed in public.

060:

Following the debate, many people remarked that both candidates were too quick to switch the discussion back to domestic issues and the economy. But I think there is a strong connection between America's traditional leadership role in the world and the vibrancy of our economy. We also need to realize that our economy is affected greatly by the economic conditions of other nations. Unless we solve our problems, lower our deficit and get back on track, our role as the world's "only superpower" will be at risk. It's not just our ideals that make us super; it's the resources we have at our disposal to address the world's problems.

Note from IWD: An article in Bloomberg Business Week expresses much the same point of view, with the author Romesh Ratnesar saying, “…the most critical national security test facing the next president isn’t terrorism, which Obama picked during the Oct. 22 debate; or Iran, as Romney said. Focus instead on the $16.2 trillion national debt, more than 33 percent of which is foreign-owned, with China alone holding $1.15 trillion.” Read more: http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-10-24/theres-nothing-foreign-about-foreign-policy#r=hp-ls

352:

The reality of the economy is still of utmost importance to most Americans. If not for this incredible bungling, mishandling or outright deception regarding the Libyan matter, we may not have known the level of competency the current administration posseses in this crucial area of responsibility.

148:

I'm of the same mind as Mayor Bloomberg of New York -- disappointed with both candidates because all we get is one-liners and phrases. Neither candidate has an economic plan to solve our deep financial issues; neither will take on the NRA regarding assault weapons; fully express their ideas regarding gay marriage; a women's right to choose; and the long term solutions to climate change and many other important issues facing our country. And now tonight we will listen to the debate regarding foreign policy. Romney will spend the entire evening trying to embarrass the President about the lax security in Libya and Obama will try and show that Romney has no experience with foreign policy... welcome to London. I HAVE AN IDEA!...is it possible to have the two candidates engage in a DIALOGUE about what is best for the U.S. instead of what is wrong with each other?...wishful thinking on my part.

536:

Because the candidates were vague about identifying what they think our main foreign policy issues are, I did a little searching and found this report by NBC News about the top 10 foreign policy issues the New President will face: http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/10/22/14613799-top-10-foreign-policy-issues-facing-a-new-president?lite

Note from IWD: We appreciate member 536 alerting us to this article, because it seems a good list. A preview of the 10 challenges they chose:

Possible Afghan collapse/civil war

Possible Iran implosion or explosion

Rise of the Muslim Brotherhood

Cyber threat

Israeli strike on Iran

Revival of al-Qaida/Ansar al-Sharia

Rift with Pakistan

Mexico and the Growing Drug War

U.S. Pivot to Asia/China Slowdown

United States Drifting? (Has fighting terrorism has become our only “foreign policy?”)

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