topic
Occupy Wall Street

Introduced: October 17 2011

Since last spring, demonstrations have spread around the world. Now the U.S. has one of its own. What’s it all about and how does it resonate with you?

 

First came Arab Spring and then protests in London and Greece. America's homegrown movement -- Occupy Wall Street -- has branches all across the nation.  It's a sort of big umbrella of a protest that covers a lot of issues. Just a quick look at the issues protestors articulate comes up with a list like this: big bank bailout, economic inequality, “We’re the 99%,” “We got sold out, the banks got bailed out,” partisan paralysis, corporate greed, capitalism itself, poverty and austerity plans, cozy relationship between politicians and Wall Street, and in Tokyo – “No More Nukes” and “Free Tibet.”

 

Do these demonstrations serve a useful purpose? If so, what? Do they have anything in common with the civil rights demonstrations or anti-war protests of the past – or are they a different breed? Among all the “causes” associated with the demonstrations, is there ONE that makes particular sense to you?” Even if you don’t agree with the method, is there a message your support?

 

Photo: The remains of Occupy Washington, D.C. (March 2012)

 

Dialogue on Occupy Wall Street
091:

Occupy Wallstreet: maybe there are some focused and principled people there, but they are overshadowed by hippocrits (hate capitalism; where's my IPad, my free education, my patent for inventing dumb tee shirt slogans; more money from the capitalists???). A good thought that I read somewhere: When one-half the people think they do not have to work because the other-half will take care of them and, when the other-half thinks it does no good to work because someone else is going to get what they work for, that is the beginning of the end of any nation.

161:

I don’t think it’s surprising that the Occupy Wall Street movement has run its course and now the remaining demonstrators may be finding out that protest movements – like wars – are easier to start than to finish. As I write this, they have removed the people in New York, hosed down the area and will not allow them to sleep there again. The legal basis for this is violations to the noise and sanitation codes. What did they accomplish? Awareness, perhaps.

313:

Did they make their point? I agree with Joel Connelly who wrote in SeattlePI.com that OWS made Middle America pay attention to the “real issue of wealth disparity and Wall Street greed” but now it’s time to make sure that message doesn’t get undermined by “a small, noisy minority of “anarchists, show-offs, and those just mad at the world.”

081:

To be honest I haven't been following any of "it" very closely lately. It's overload. Too many candidates, too many huge swings in the market and too much rhetoric that is ridiculous! The Occupy Wall Street protesters, in my opinion, are somewhat symbolic of what is going on in our country. No real leader from either party, no concrete objectives or plans that don't sound like any thing other than politics as usual. Nothing happens without money. Lots of it. Without a large influx of funds (and that won't happen if a credible leader doesn't emerge) the Wall Street protesters will be gone or drastically reduced in numbers with the approaching winter. In general though, I do feel a little more optimistic. I think the people in this country are going to demand change - whether its a group like the Wall Street protesters or another group, and probably many others. It wouldn't surprise me if we had riots etc. on the scale of the sixties. This election is one of the most important elections we have had in decades ( I will start paying attention again as the field narrows) but now I feel that little will be solved with one election. There will be more pain, more protests and who knows what - but this country needs big changes and I pray a leader emerges.

136:

I agree with those who said that protesting against capitalism – not the specific excesses of some business and financial people, but against the whole system makes me nervous. I saw an interview in Newsweek with the CEO of PepsiCo who said, “Here’s the problem (about Occupy Wall Street protestors). They are protesting capitalism. To me, capitalism is a source of job creation, it’s a source of innovation, it’s what keeps the engines of democracy going. It’s wrong to paint with a negative broad brush on capitalism.” I started reading the article because I saw it was about Occupy Wall Street but kept reading because the CEO is a woman and she is taking PepsiCo in a different direction – toward healthier foods and into a lot of projects that other people call “do-gooder” efforts. One of the examples is a recycling program that’s connected to job training for disabled veterans. She says, “What they might be protesting is the part of capitalism that went awry. We’re doing the right thing and it’s creating jobs.”

041:

As IWD pointed out, there a variety of issues involved with Occupy Wall Street, but most have to do with the difficulties real people are having just surviving. Statistics tell the story and so the stories of individuals. Working in a social service agency in a big city, we only see a larger, quicker deterioration of services and choices for a rapidly growing underclass. The rate of poverty and distress is frightening. I found the recent issue of Mike Berman's "Washington Political Watch" full of good information answering the question: Has the United States become a country in which living well has become a contest best described as survival of the fittest? http://www.mikeswashingtonwatch.com/

Note from IWD: Some facts from Washington Political Watch on the current American scene:

• Detroit Michigan is closing half of its public schools.

• Camden New Jersey has laid off half of it’s police force.

• Among Americans under 24 years of age, unemployment is 18%.

• The number of homeless children in public schools increased by 41% from the 2006-07 school year and the 2008-09 school year.

050:

What began as a “grass roots,” leaderless movement is beginning to look like a corporation itself. More than $500,000 has been donated (to whom? for what?) Some one speaking for Occupy Wall Street is now making “financial report.” Several people have applied for trademarks so they can have exclusive rights to sell t-shirts, backpacks, etc. that say “Occupy Wall Street.”

033:

In Chicago, the Tribune reported that city officials were getting good practice with demonstrations that would prove helpful because Chicago has two international summits coming up next spring and summer. It’s just so interesting reading about the dynamics of the group. When Mayor Rahm Emanuel orderd that the 11 p.m. curfew in Grant Park would be enforced, the organizers divided 500 protestors into three groups: those that wanted to be arrested, those that didn’t, and those who weren’t sure.

Note from IWD: From the official Occupy Wall Street web site: www.occupywallstreet.org: End wealth inequality. End capital punishment. End police intimidation. End corporate censorship. End American imperialism. End war. (And others) (The site says this is “not an official list of demands.”)

203:

What resonates with me is that all of us get tired of not being heard. The politicians listen to the big corporations and the big corporations pay attention to the politicians and the rest of us go unheard.

050:

The variety of Occupy Wall Street "issues" obviously shows there is a lot of discontent floating around. It seems that what’s emerging is a focus on “corruption” and “greed.” No one likes those things. But like a lot of other things in today’s society – people don’t really think past the moment to see what their “unintended consequences” are. Anything at this moment that gets in the way of the economic wheel beginning to turn again will have negative consequences for everyone.

035:

I found an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal by Douglas Schoen that said the protestors are “radical left” and if Democrats side with them, it will work against them in the 2012 election. He pointed to the fact that Democrats supported the anti-war movement in 1972, and the Republicans won four out of five of the next elections. It’s not that simple, though, is it?– because if the Democrats court Occupy Wall Street and the Republicans court the Tea Party, who’s left to win? Maybe moderates.

136:

On a slightly different, but related topic, I LOVED the fact that Netflix tried to raise their subscription rates and people decided to end their subscriptions rather than pay more. That’s a protest in itself. Now Netflix stock is sinking, and maybe that will serve as a lesson to other companies who try to take advantage of people during these hard times. I haven’t followed the banks’ attempts to raise service charges – but I hope the same thing is happening there.

060:

Some people say the protests are “anti-capitalism.” I would hate to see people take it that far, because the alternatives aren’t good. Is there a reasonable way to set up corporate oversight without limiting the American entrepreneurial spirit?

244:

It’s a modern movement for sure. The protestors have set up food service and a first aid station. They’ve started a newspaper and a “library” with collected books on pertinent topics. And of course, a web site. www.occupywallstreet.org

012:

The list you gave of concerns being voiced in the Occupy Wall Street protests was interesting – but as days have gone on, it seems that one of the main themes is that the U.S. corporate elite has an unhealthy amount of influence on what takes place in government. How does that happen? Maybe it’s time to revisit the decision the Supreme Court made in January that the government has no right to regulate political speech – which opens the door to unlimited campaign contributions to candidates.



Note from IWD: The Supreme Court voted 5-4, overruling two previous decisions, one in 1990 and one in 2002 that limited the contributions that could be made by corporations and unions. The basis of this year’s decision was the First Amendment prohibiting limits on political speech. Dissenters said that a corporation does not have the same free speech rights as an individual.

194:

I read that this movement for the Left is what the Tea Party is for the Right. ..and yet they seem to agree on one thing – the government and Wall Street are in cahoots.

218:

Watching the protests on TV, it seems a lot of the protestors are young. Many are probably unemployed, and that gives them time to protest. Some of us are not prone to protests. Hopefully, we’ll have the chance between now and November 2012 to decide how to influence things with our votes. But in the meantime, I think a lot of us share the disappointment and frustration. Look what we’ve had to watch over the past several years: a number of big corporations gaining through greed and fraud, ponzi schemes, the banks taking the bailout money and then rising to new profit levels, our politicians taking us to the brink of default and hardly making progress toward solving our problems. If the alternative is to sit passively by and wait for things to change on their own, then I say good for the people who find a way to make a point.

Note from IWD:  Definition of ponzi:  According to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, a ponzi scheme is “an investment fraud that involves the payment of purported returns to existing investors from funds contributed by new investors. Ponzi scheme organizers often solicit new investors by promising to invest funds in opportunities claimed to generate high returns with little or no risk. In many ponzi schemes, the fraudsters focus on attracting new money to make promised payments to earlier-stage investors and to use for personal expenses, instead of engaging in any legitimate investment activity.” www.sec.gov/answers/ponzi.htm

213:

If you feel like I do and you are tired of all the extreme points of view on the right AND the left, I recommend an article in the October 24 issue of Time magazine entitled “The Return of the Silent Majority.”

091:

Occupy Wallstreet: maybe there are some focused and principled people there, but they are overshadowed by hippocrits (hate capitalism; where's my IPad, my free education, my patent for inventing dumb tee shirt slogans; more money from the capitalists???). A good thought that I read somewhere: When one-half the people think they do not have to work because the other-half will take care of them and, when the other-half thinks it does no good to work because someone else is going to get what they work for, that is the beginning of the end of any nation.

161:

I don’t think it’s surprising that the Occupy Wall Street movement has run its course and now the remaining demonstrators may be finding out that protest movements – like wars – are easier to start than to finish. As I write this, they have removed the people in New York, hosed down the area and will not allow them to sleep there again. The legal basis for this is violations to the noise and sanitation codes. What did they accomplish? Awareness, perhaps.

313:

Did they make their point? I agree with Joel Connelly who wrote in SeattlePI.com that OWS made Middle America pay attention to the “real issue of wealth disparity and Wall Street greed” but now it’s time to make sure that message doesn’t get undermined by “a small, noisy minority of “anarchists, show-offs, and those just mad at the world.”

081:

To be honest I haven't been following any of "it" very closely lately. It's overload. Too many candidates, too many huge swings in the market and too much rhetoric that is ridiculous! The Occupy Wall Street protesters, in my opinion, are somewhat symbolic of what is going on in our country. No real leader from either party, no concrete objectives or plans that don't sound like any thing other than politics as usual. Nothing happens without money. Lots of it. Without a large influx of funds (and that won't happen if a credible leader doesn't emerge) the Wall Street protesters will be gone or drastically reduced in numbers with the approaching winter. In general though, I do feel a little more optimistic. I think the people in this country are going to demand change - whether its a group like the Wall Street protesters or another group, and probably many others. It wouldn't surprise me if we had riots etc. on the scale of the sixties. This election is one of the most important elections we have had in decades ( I will start paying attention again as the field narrows) but now I feel that little will be solved with one election. There will be more pain, more protests and who knows what - but this country needs big changes and I pray a leader emerges.

136:

I agree with those who said that protesting against capitalism – not the specific excesses of some business and financial people, but against the whole system makes me nervous. I saw an interview in Newsweek with the CEO of PepsiCo who said, “Here’s the problem (about Occupy Wall Street protestors). They are protesting capitalism. To me, capitalism is a source of job creation, it’s a source of innovation, it’s what keeps the engines of democracy going. It’s wrong to paint with a negative broad brush on capitalism.” I started reading the article because I saw it was about Occupy Wall Street but kept reading because the CEO is a woman and she is taking PepsiCo in a different direction – toward healthier foods and into a lot of projects that other people call “do-gooder” efforts. One of the examples is a recycling program that’s connected to job training for disabled veterans. She says, “What they might be protesting is the part of capitalism that went awry. We’re doing the right thing and it’s creating jobs.”

041:

As IWD pointed out, there a variety of issues involved with Occupy Wall Street, but most have to do with the difficulties real people are having just surviving. Statistics tell the story and so the stories of individuals. Working in a social service agency in a big city, we only see a larger, quicker deterioration of services and choices for a rapidly growing underclass. The rate of poverty and distress is frightening. I found the recent issue of Mike Berman's "Washington Political Watch" full of good information answering the question: Has the United States become a country in which living well has become a contest best described as survival of the fittest? http://www.mikeswashingtonwatch.com/

Note from IWD: Some facts from Washington Political Watch on the current American scene:

• Detroit Michigan is closing half of its public schools.

• Camden New Jersey has laid off half of it’s police force.

• Among Americans under 24 years of age, unemployment is 18%.

• The number of homeless children in public schools increased by 41% from the 2006-07 school year and the 2008-09 school year.

050:

What began as a “grass roots,” leaderless movement is beginning to look like a corporation itself. More than $500,000 has been donated (to whom? for what?) Some one speaking for Occupy Wall Street is now making “financial report.” Several people have applied for trademarks so they can have exclusive rights to sell t-shirts, backpacks, etc. that say “Occupy Wall Street.”

033:

In Chicago, the Tribune reported that city officials were getting good practice with demonstrations that would prove helpful because Chicago has two international summits coming up next spring and summer. It’s just so interesting reading about the dynamics of the group. When Mayor Rahm Emanuel orderd that the 11 p.m. curfew in Grant Park would be enforced, the organizers divided 500 protestors into three groups: those that wanted to be arrested, those that didn’t, and those who weren’t sure.

Note from IWD: From the official Occupy Wall Street web site: www.occupywallstreet.org: End wealth inequality. End capital punishment. End police intimidation. End corporate censorship. End American imperialism. End war. (And others) (The site says this is “not an official list of demands.”)

203:

What resonates with me is that all of us get tired of not being heard. The politicians listen to the big corporations and the big corporations pay attention to the politicians and the rest of us go unheard.

050:

The variety of Occupy Wall Street "issues" obviously shows there is a lot of discontent floating around. It seems that what’s emerging is a focus on “corruption” and “greed.” No one likes those things. But like a lot of other things in today’s society – people don’t really think past the moment to see what their “unintended consequences” are. Anything at this moment that gets in the way of the economic wheel beginning to turn again will have negative consequences for everyone.

035:

I found an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal by Douglas Schoen that said the protestors are “radical left” and if Democrats side with them, it will work against them in the 2012 election. He pointed to the fact that Democrats supported the anti-war movement in 1972, and the Republicans won four out of five of the next elections. It’s not that simple, though, is it?– because if the Democrats court Occupy Wall Street and the Republicans court the Tea Party, who’s left to win? Maybe moderates.

136:

On a slightly different, but related topic, I LOVED the fact that Netflix tried to raise their subscription rates and people decided to end their subscriptions rather than pay more. That’s a protest in itself. Now Netflix stock is sinking, and maybe that will serve as a lesson to other companies who try to take advantage of people during these hard times. I haven’t followed the banks’ attempts to raise service charges – but I hope the same thing is happening there.

060:

Some people say the protests are “anti-capitalism.” I would hate to see people take it that far, because the alternatives aren’t good. Is there a reasonable way to set up corporate oversight without limiting the American entrepreneurial spirit?

244:

It’s a modern movement for sure. The protestors have set up food service and a first aid station. They’ve started a newspaper and a “library” with collected books on pertinent topics. And of course, a web site. www.occupywallstreet.org

012:

The list you gave of concerns being voiced in the Occupy Wall Street protests was interesting – but as days have gone on, it seems that one of the main themes is that the U.S. corporate elite has an unhealthy amount of influence on what takes place in government. How does that happen? Maybe it’s time to revisit the decision the Supreme Court made in January that the government has no right to regulate political speech – which opens the door to unlimited campaign contributions to candidates.



Note from IWD: The Supreme Court voted 5-4, overruling two previous decisions, one in 1990 and one in 2002 that limited the contributions that could be made by corporations and unions. The basis of this year’s decision was the First Amendment prohibiting limits on political speech. Dissenters said that a corporation does not have the same free speech rights as an individual.

194:

I read that this movement for the Left is what the Tea Party is for the Right. ..and yet they seem to agree on one thing – the government and Wall Street are in cahoots.

218:

Watching the protests on TV, it seems a lot of the protestors are young. Many are probably unemployed, and that gives them time to protest. Some of us are not prone to protests. Hopefully, we’ll have the chance between now and November 2012 to decide how to influence things with our votes. But in the meantime, I think a lot of us share the disappointment and frustration. Look what we’ve had to watch over the past several years: a number of big corporations gaining through greed and fraud, ponzi schemes, the banks taking the bailout money and then rising to new profit levels, our politicians taking us to the brink of default and hardly making progress toward solving our problems. If the alternative is to sit passively by and wait for things to change on their own, then I say good for the people who find a way to make a point.

Note from IWD:  Definition of ponzi:  According to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, a ponzi scheme is “an investment fraud that involves the payment of purported returns to existing investors from funds contributed by new investors. Ponzi scheme organizers often solicit new investors by promising to invest funds in opportunities claimed to generate high returns with little or no risk. In many ponzi schemes, the fraudsters focus on attracting new money to make promised payments to earlier-stage investors and to use for personal expenses, instead of engaging in any legitimate investment activity.” www.sec.gov/answers/ponzi.htm

213:

If you feel like I do and you are tired of all the extreme points of view on the right AND the left, I recommend an article in the October 24 issue of Time magazine entitled “The Return of the Silent Majority.”

213:

If you feel like I do and you are tired of all the extreme points of view on the right AND the left, I recommend an article in the October 24 issue of Time magazine entitled “The Return of the Silent Majority.”

218:

Watching the protests on TV, it seems a lot of the protestors are young. Many are probably unemployed, and that gives them time to protest. Some of us are not prone to protests. Hopefully, we’ll have the chance between now and November 2012 to decide how to influence things with our votes. But in the meantime, I think a lot of us share the disappointment and frustration. Look what we’ve had to watch over the past several years: a number of big corporations gaining through greed and fraud, ponzi schemes, the banks taking the bailout money and then rising to new profit levels, our politicians taking us to the brink of default and hardly making progress toward solving our problems. If the alternative is to sit passively by and wait for things to change on their own, then I say good for the people who find a way to make a point.

Note from IWD:  Definition of ponzi:  According to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, a ponzi scheme is “an investment fraud that involves the payment of purported returns to existing investors from funds contributed by new investors. Ponzi scheme organizers often solicit new investors by promising to invest funds in opportunities claimed to generate high returns with little or no risk. In many ponzi schemes, the fraudsters focus on attracting new money to make promised payments to earlier-stage investors and to use for personal expenses, instead of engaging in any legitimate investment activity.” www.sec.gov/answers/ponzi.htm

194:

I read that this movement for the Left is what the Tea Party is for the Right. ..and yet they seem to agree on one thing – the government and Wall Street are in cahoots.

012:

The list you gave of concerns being voiced in the Occupy Wall Street protests was interesting – but as days have gone on, it seems that one of the main themes is that the U.S. corporate elite has an unhealthy amount of influence on what takes place in government. How does that happen? Maybe it’s time to revisit the decision the Supreme Court made in January that the government has no right to regulate political speech – which opens the door to unlimited campaign contributions to candidates.



Note from IWD: The Supreme Court voted 5-4, overruling two previous decisions, one in 1990 and one in 2002 that limited the contributions that could be made by corporations and unions. The basis of this year’s decision was the First Amendment prohibiting limits on political speech. Dissenters said that a corporation does not have the same free speech rights as an individual.

244:

It’s a modern movement for sure. The protestors have set up food service and a first aid station. They’ve started a newspaper and a “library” with collected books on pertinent topics. And of course, a web site. www.occupywallstreet.org

060:

Some people say the protests are “anti-capitalism.” I would hate to see people take it that far, because the alternatives aren’t good. Is there a reasonable way to set up corporate oversight without limiting the American entrepreneurial spirit?

136:

On a slightly different, but related topic, I LOVED the fact that Netflix tried to raise their subscription rates and people decided to end their subscriptions rather than pay more. That’s a protest in itself. Now Netflix stock is sinking, and maybe that will serve as a lesson to other companies who try to take advantage of people during these hard times. I haven’t followed the banks’ attempts to raise service charges – but I hope the same thing is happening there.

035:

I found an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal by Douglas Schoen that said the protestors are “radical left” and if Democrats side with them, it will work against them in the 2012 election. He pointed to the fact that Democrats supported the anti-war movement in 1972, and the Republicans won four out of five of the next elections. It’s not that simple, though, is it?– because if the Democrats court Occupy Wall Street and the Republicans court the Tea Party, who’s left to win? Maybe moderates.

050:

The variety of Occupy Wall Street "issues" obviously shows there is a lot of discontent floating around. It seems that what’s emerging is a focus on “corruption” and “greed.” No one likes those things. But like a lot of other things in today’s society – people don’t really think past the moment to see what their “unintended consequences” are. Anything at this moment that gets in the way of the economic wheel beginning to turn again will have negative consequences for everyone.

203:

What resonates with me is that all of us get tired of not being heard. The politicians listen to the big corporations and the big corporations pay attention to the politicians and the rest of us go unheard.

033:

In Chicago, the Tribune reported that city officials were getting good practice with demonstrations that would prove helpful because Chicago has two international summits coming up next spring and summer. It’s just so interesting reading about the dynamics of the group. When Mayor Rahm Emanuel orderd that the 11 p.m. curfew in Grant Park would be enforced, the organizers divided 500 protestors into three groups: those that wanted to be arrested, those that didn’t, and those who weren’t sure.

Note from IWD: From the official Occupy Wall Street web site: www.occupywallstreet.org: End wealth inequality. End capital punishment. End police intimidation. End corporate censorship. End American imperialism. End war. (And others) (The site says this is “not an official list of demands.”)

050:

What began as a “grass roots,” leaderless movement is beginning to look like a corporation itself. More than $500,000 has been donated (to whom? for what?) Some one speaking for Occupy Wall Street is now making “financial report.” Several people have applied for trademarks so they can have exclusive rights to sell t-shirts, backpacks, etc. that say “Occupy Wall Street.”

041:

As IWD pointed out, there a variety of issues involved with Occupy Wall Street, but most have to do with the difficulties real people are having just surviving. Statistics tell the story and so the stories of individuals. Working in a social service agency in a big city, we only see a larger, quicker deterioration of services and choices for a rapidly growing underclass. The rate of poverty and distress is frightening. I found the recent issue of Mike Berman's "Washington Political Watch" full of good information answering the question: Has the United States become a country in which living well has become a contest best described as survival of the fittest? http://www.mikeswashingtonwatch.com/

Note from IWD: Some facts from Washington Political Watch on the current American scene:

• Detroit Michigan is closing half of its public schools.

• Camden New Jersey has laid off half of it’s police force.

• Among Americans under 24 years of age, unemployment is 18%.

• The number of homeless children in public schools increased by 41% from the 2006-07 school year and the 2008-09 school year.

136:

I agree with those who said that protesting against capitalism – not the specific excesses of some business and financial people, but against the whole system makes me nervous. I saw an interview in Newsweek with the CEO of PepsiCo who said, “Here’s the problem (about Occupy Wall Street protestors). They are protesting capitalism. To me, capitalism is a source of job creation, it’s a source of innovation, it’s what keeps the engines of democracy going. It’s wrong to paint with a negative broad brush on capitalism.” I started reading the article because I saw it was about Occupy Wall Street but kept reading because the CEO is a woman and she is taking PepsiCo in a different direction – toward healthier foods and into a lot of projects that other people call “do-gooder” efforts. One of the examples is a recycling program that’s connected to job training for disabled veterans. She says, “What they might be protesting is the part of capitalism that went awry. We’re doing the right thing and it’s creating jobs.”

081:

To be honest I haven't been following any of "it" very closely lately. It's overload. Too many candidates, too many huge swings in the market and too much rhetoric that is ridiculous! The Occupy Wall Street protesters, in my opinion, are somewhat symbolic of what is going on in our country. No real leader from either party, no concrete objectives or plans that don't sound like any thing other than politics as usual. Nothing happens without money. Lots of it. Without a large influx of funds (and that won't happen if a credible leader doesn't emerge) the Wall Street protesters will be gone or drastically reduced in numbers with the approaching winter. In general though, I do feel a little more optimistic. I think the people in this country are going to demand change - whether its a group like the Wall Street protesters or another group, and probably many others. It wouldn't surprise me if we had riots etc. on the scale of the sixties. This election is one of the most important elections we have had in decades ( I will start paying attention again as the field narrows) but now I feel that little will be solved with one election. There will be more pain, more protests and who knows what - but this country needs big changes and I pray a leader emerges.

313:

Did they make their point? I agree with Joel Connelly who wrote in SeattlePI.com that OWS made Middle America pay attention to the “real issue of wealth disparity and Wall Street greed” but now it’s time to make sure that message doesn’t get undermined by “a small, noisy minority of “anarchists, show-offs, and those just mad at the world.”

161:

I don’t think it’s surprising that the Occupy Wall Street movement has run its course and now the remaining demonstrators may be finding out that protest movements – like wars – are easier to start than to finish. As I write this, they have removed the people in New York, hosed down the area and will not allow them to sleep there again. The legal basis for this is violations to the noise and sanitation codes. What did they accomplish? Awareness, perhaps.

091:

Occupy Wallstreet: maybe there are some focused and principled people there, but they are overshadowed by hippocrits (hate capitalism; where's my IPad, my free education, my patent for inventing dumb tee shirt slogans; more money from the capitalists???). A good thought that I read somewhere: When one-half the people think they do not have to work because the other-half will take care of them and, when the other-half thinks it does no good to work because someone else is going to get what they work for, that is the beginning of the end of any nation.

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