topic
Is Scott Walker Your Cup of Tea?

Introduced: June 06 2012

Scott Walker, Governor of Wisconsin, survived a recall vote on June 5th. Now he's being called a "Republican Folk Hero." What do you think about him? And what impact do you think the vote in Wisconsin will have on the upcoming Presidential election? 

Dialogue on Is Scott Walker Your Cup of Tea?
IWD:

From IWD: Getting caught up - September 2012

After surviving a recall vote in Wisconsin, Scott Walker was riding a wave of popularity, and even being talked about as a potential running mate for Mitt Romney. Since his fellow Wisconsonian, Paul Ryan, was tapped to be the vice presidential candidate, Walker has continued to campaign for the ticket. Walker's speech at the Convention was praised by Republicans. About other speakers at the convention, Walker said the Clint Eastwood presentation (where he spoke to an empty chair as if talking to President Obama) made him cringe, and he was videoed being so moved by Paul Ryan's speech that he became teary. Recently, Walker urged Romney to be stonger, bolder, and more specific about his plans to improve the economy, create jobs and solve the nation’s budget deficit.

Wisconsin is considered a swing state that traditionally has voted for Democrats in Presidential elections, but Republicans may feel more optimistic this year having two young political stars from the state.

(The impetus for Walker's recall vote was his successful move to end collective bargaining for public workers in Wisconsin. That issue in still being resolved in court.)

390:

I was reading comment from member 339 (posted June 28) and purely from my personal associative logic I was reminded of a quotation I read on Facebook today reflecting on Independence Day: "It's a complex fate, being an American--& one of the responsibilities it entails is fighting against a superstitious valuation of Europe." --Henry James

Scott Walker is not my cup of tea. I have friends that consistently vote Republican, often against their own economic interest, seemingly because Republicans are perceived as patriotic and upholding principles of independence from the time of America's founding. I think Walker and others will widen the gap in opportunities for the poor versus the wealthy.

328:

I agree he made an impact on voters. His request for public employees to adjust and/or reduce their pension plans is not out of order. Most of us have had to embrace the idea of a 401k where the employee contributes to their retirement plan; it's time for public employees to fall in line...it's the future.

118:

I admire Scott Walker for taking a bold position and seeing it through.

015:

Before we go thinking that Scott Walker is some kind of knight on a white horse, let’s remember the amount of money that was pumped into his campaign, including money from people a long way away from Wisconsin. Walker outspent his Democratic rival $30.5 million to $4 million. Walker spent 88% of the money and he got 53% of the vote.

Note from IWD: According to CBS News, the outside investors included Houston homebuilder Bob Perry and Las Vegas casino mogul Sheldon Aldeson, who each gave walker $250,000 this year, and Wyoming investor Foster Friess, who gave $100,000. CBS also said, “The reason Walker could exceed the state's legal limit on donations of $10,000 per donor is due to a 1987 loophole (pushed by a former state legislator who later ran afoul of the law) providing an exception for any incumbent targeted by a recall.”

210:

If you’re trying to interpret anything about voters from the vote on Scott Walker in Wisconsin, it’s interesting to look at the exit polls. A majority of voters was in favor of keeping Walker as their governor – but a majority also expects to vote for Obama in November. Also, a majority of the voters have a positive view of public employees, so it wasn’t as simple as a renunciation of unions and public employees. Instead, it makes sense to interpret the vote as a sign that voters are willing to support efforts to reform public unions and won’t penalize a governor or other official who tries to do that. One of the reforms a lot of people have in mind is making it not mandatory to join a union – so if fewer people join, the negotiating power of unions will decrease.

Note from IWD: Remember what started all this about a recall in Wisconsin: Governor Walker, in addition to eliminating collective bargaining rights for most public employees, reduced take-home pay to cover pension contributions, and required higher health insurance premiums and co-pays.

339:

I remain neutral as to my opinion on Scott Walker. I will approach the entire recall situation from a different perspective. There is a fundamental lesson to be learned by all as a result of the Wisconsin recall elections. It is not a matter of who won or who lost. It is my hope that all sides learn the art of compromise. The buzz word that is being bantered around as if it means nothing is the word "reform." This word, when used to address anything that affects the core components of the lives of human beings automatically brings about fear for the sustainability of their immediate lives and their futures. We see this all across our country. Whether it is the reform of collective bargaining as in WI, the reform of pensions for retired teachers who barely survive on less than $30,000 while paying high health insurance rates in IL, or at the Federal level in too many programs to mention.
When leaders get into public office whether they are Democrat, Republican, or Independent, they must always remember that they were hired by the people and they work for ALL people. Additionally, it is their responsibility to protect ALL people from fiscal crisis by enforcing fiscal accountability and responsibility upon themselves at all times within the governmental budget.
Special Interest groups must also support the fiscal responsibilities of the government, however, they should have the right to advocate for the rights of employees.
When the special interest groups have held up their end of the bargain -- and the government has not -- is when the trains collide and the government starts using the infamous "Reform" word.
So the lesson that should be learned from Wisconsin is not about Scott Walker. It is about holding government responsible for fiscal responsibility, upholding human rights, which is the absolute and fundamental core behind the right to bargain for ones working conditions and wages. Additionally, securing a pension is a basic human right as our country's history reflects, and in IL it is protected by the IL constitution.
The lesson for all is responsible government that recognizes the human rights of ALL people and works collaboratively to that end.

321:

I think it’s a fact that most people won’t vote to recall a sitting governor. Only two have been successfully voted out: Governor Lynn Frazier was voted out in North Dakota in 1921, and California Governor Gray Davis was recalled in 2003.

308:

Using a governorship to move high in politics, like even to the White House, is a good path. If Scott Walker is smart – and if he has other major moves to accomplish – he won’t be dropping out of sight.

Note from IWD: If you’re curious about how many and which Presidents had previously served as a governor, here it is: In recent history, it was Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. In not-so-recent times, 14 others – incuding four from New York (Van Buren, Cleveland, Teddy Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt; (three from Virginia (Jefferson, Monroe and Tyler from Virginia);and 6 others (not counting territories before they were officially states).

IWD:

From IWD: Getting caught up - September 2012

After surviving a recall vote in Wisconsin, Scott Walker was riding a wave of popularity, and even being talked about as a potential running mate for Mitt Romney. Since his fellow Wisconsonian, Paul Ryan, was tapped to be the vice presidential candidate, Walker has continued to campaign for the ticket. Walker's speech at the Convention was praised by Republicans. About other speakers at the convention, Walker said the Clint Eastwood presentation (where he spoke to an empty chair as if talking to President Obama) made him cringe, and he was videoed being so moved by Paul Ryan's speech that he became teary. Recently, Walker urged Romney to be stonger, bolder, and more specific about his plans to improve the economy, create jobs and solve the nation’s budget deficit.

Wisconsin is considered a swing state that traditionally has voted for Democrats in Presidential elections, but Republicans may feel more optimistic this year having two young political stars from the state.

(The impetus for Walker's recall vote was his successful move to end collective bargaining for public workers in Wisconsin. That issue in still being resolved in court.)

390:

I was reading comment from member 339 (posted June 28) and purely from my personal associative logic I was reminded of a quotation I read on Facebook today reflecting on Independence Day: "It's a complex fate, being an American--& one of the responsibilities it entails is fighting against a superstitious valuation of Europe." --Henry James

Scott Walker is not my cup of tea. I have friends that consistently vote Republican, often against their own economic interest, seemingly because Republicans are perceived as patriotic and upholding principles of independence from the time of America's founding. I think Walker and others will widen the gap in opportunities for the poor versus the wealthy.

328:

I agree he made an impact on voters. His request for public employees to adjust and/or reduce their pension plans is not out of order. Most of us have had to embrace the idea of a 401k where the employee contributes to their retirement plan; it's time for public employees to fall in line...it's the future.

118:

I admire Scott Walker for taking a bold position and seeing it through.

015:

Before we go thinking that Scott Walker is some kind of knight on a white horse, let’s remember the amount of money that was pumped into his campaign, including money from people a long way away from Wisconsin. Walker outspent his Democratic rival $30.5 million to $4 million. Walker spent 88% of the money and he got 53% of the vote.

Note from IWD: According to CBS News, the outside investors included Houston homebuilder Bob Perry and Las Vegas casino mogul Sheldon Aldeson, who each gave walker $250,000 this year, and Wyoming investor Foster Friess, who gave $100,000. CBS also said, “The reason Walker could exceed the state's legal limit on donations of $10,000 per donor is due to a 1987 loophole (pushed by a former state legislator who later ran afoul of the law) providing an exception for any incumbent targeted by a recall.”

210:

If you’re trying to interpret anything about voters from the vote on Scott Walker in Wisconsin, it’s interesting to look at the exit polls. A majority of voters was in favor of keeping Walker as their governor – but a majority also expects to vote for Obama in November. Also, a majority of the voters have a positive view of public employees, so it wasn’t as simple as a renunciation of unions and public employees. Instead, it makes sense to interpret the vote as a sign that voters are willing to support efforts to reform public unions and won’t penalize a governor or other official who tries to do that. One of the reforms a lot of people have in mind is making it not mandatory to join a union – so if fewer people join, the negotiating power of unions will decrease.

Note from IWD: Remember what started all this about a recall in Wisconsin: Governor Walker, in addition to eliminating collective bargaining rights for most public employees, reduced take-home pay to cover pension contributions, and required higher health insurance premiums and co-pays.

339:

I remain neutral as to my opinion on Scott Walker. I will approach the entire recall situation from a different perspective. There is a fundamental lesson to be learned by all as a result of the Wisconsin recall elections. It is not a matter of who won or who lost. It is my hope that all sides learn the art of compromise. The buzz word that is being bantered around as if it means nothing is the word "reform." This word, when used to address anything that affects the core components of the lives of human beings automatically brings about fear for the sustainability of their immediate lives and their futures. We see this all across our country. Whether it is the reform of collective bargaining as in WI, the reform of pensions for retired teachers who barely survive on less than $30,000 while paying high health insurance rates in IL, or at the Federal level in too many programs to mention.
When leaders get into public office whether they are Democrat, Republican, or Independent, they must always remember that they were hired by the people and they work for ALL people. Additionally, it is their responsibility to protect ALL people from fiscal crisis by enforcing fiscal accountability and responsibility upon themselves at all times within the governmental budget.
Special Interest groups must also support the fiscal responsibilities of the government, however, they should have the right to advocate for the rights of employees.
When the special interest groups have held up their end of the bargain -- and the government has not -- is when the trains collide and the government starts using the infamous "Reform" word.
So the lesson that should be learned from Wisconsin is not about Scott Walker. It is about holding government responsible for fiscal responsibility, upholding human rights, which is the absolute and fundamental core behind the right to bargain for ones working conditions and wages. Additionally, securing a pension is a basic human right as our country's history reflects, and in IL it is protected by the IL constitution.
The lesson for all is responsible government that recognizes the human rights of ALL people and works collaboratively to that end.

321:

I think it’s a fact that most people won’t vote to recall a sitting governor. Only two have been successfully voted out: Governor Lynn Frazier was voted out in North Dakota in 1921, and California Governor Gray Davis was recalled in 2003.

308:

Using a governorship to move high in politics, like even to the White House, is a good path. If Scott Walker is smart – and if he has other major moves to accomplish – he won’t be dropping out of sight.

Note from IWD: If you’re curious about how many and which Presidents had previously served as a governor, here it is: In recent history, it was Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. In not-so-recent times, 14 others – incuding four from New York (Van Buren, Cleveland, Teddy Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt; (three from Virginia (Jefferson, Monroe and Tyler from Virginia);and 6 others (not counting territories before they were officially states).

308:

Using a governorship to move high in politics, like even to the White House, is a good path. If Scott Walker is smart – and if he has other major moves to accomplish – he won’t be dropping out of sight.

Note from IWD: If you’re curious about how many and which Presidents had previously served as a governor, here it is: In recent history, it was Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton. In not-so-recent times, 14 others – incuding four from New York (Van Buren, Cleveland, Teddy Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt; (three from Virginia (Jefferson, Monroe and Tyler from Virginia);and 6 others (not counting territories before they were officially states).

321:

I think it’s a fact that most people won’t vote to recall a sitting governor. Only two have been successfully voted out: Governor Lynn Frazier was voted out in North Dakota in 1921, and California Governor Gray Davis was recalled in 2003.

339:

I remain neutral as to my opinion on Scott Walker. I will approach the entire recall situation from a different perspective. There is a fundamental lesson to be learned by all as a result of the Wisconsin recall elections. It is not a matter of who won or who lost. It is my hope that all sides learn the art of compromise. The buzz word that is being bantered around as if it means nothing is the word "reform." This word, when used to address anything that affects the core components of the lives of human beings automatically brings about fear for the sustainability of their immediate lives and their futures. We see this all across our country. Whether it is the reform of collective bargaining as in WI, the reform of pensions for retired teachers who barely survive on less than $30,000 while paying high health insurance rates in IL, or at the Federal level in too many programs to mention.
When leaders get into public office whether they are Democrat, Republican, or Independent, they must always remember that they were hired by the people and they work for ALL people. Additionally, it is their responsibility to protect ALL people from fiscal crisis by enforcing fiscal accountability and responsibility upon themselves at all times within the governmental budget.
Special Interest groups must also support the fiscal responsibilities of the government, however, they should have the right to advocate for the rights of employees.
When the special interest groups have held up their end of the bargain -- and the government has not -- is when the trains collide and the government starts using the infamous "Reform" word.
So the lesson that should be learned from Wisconsin is not about Scott Walker. It is about holding government responsible for fiscal responsibility, upholding human rights, which is the absolute and fundamental core behind the right to bargain for ones working conditions and wages. Additionally, securing a pension is a basic human right as our country's history reflects, and in IL it is protected by the IL constitution.
The lesson for all is responsible government that recognizes the human rights of ALL people and works collaboratively to that end.

210:

If you’re trying to interpret anything about voters from the vote on Scott Walker in Wisconsin, it’s interesting to look at the exit polls. A majority of voters was in favor of keeping Walker as their governor – but a majority also expects to vote for Obama in November. Also, a majority of the voters have a positive view of public employees, so it wasn’t as simple as a renunciation of unions and public employees. Instead, it makes sense to interpret the vote as a sign that voters are willing to support efforts to reform public unions and won’t penalize a governor or other official who tries to do that. One of the reforms a lot of people have in mind is making it not mandatory to join a union – so if fewer people join, the negotiating power of unions will decrease.

Note from IWD: Remember what started all this about a recall in Wisconsin: Governor Walker, in addition to eliminating collective bargaining rights for most public employees, reduced take-home pay to cover pension contributions, and required higher health insurance premiums and co-pays.

015:

Before we go thinking that Scott Walker is some kind of knight on a white horse, let’s remember the amount of money that was pumped into his campaign, including money from people a long way away from Wisconsin. Walker outspent his Democratic rival $30.5 million to $4 million. Walker spent 88% of the money and he got 53% of the vote.

Note from IWD: According to CBS News, the outside investors included Houston homebuilder Bob Perry and Las Vegas casino mogul Sheldon Aldeson, who each gave walker $250,000 this year, and Wyoming investor Foster Friess, who gave $100,000. CBS also said, “The reason Walker could exceed the state's legal limit on donations of $10,000 per donor is due to a 1987 loophole (pushed by a former state legislator who later ran afoul of the law) providing an exception for any incumbent targeted by a recall.”

118:

I admire Scott Walker for taking a bold position and seeing it through.

328:

I agree he made an impact on voters. His request for public employees to adjust and/or reduce their pension plans is not out of order. Most of us have had to embrace the idea of a 401k where the employee contributes to their retirement plan; it's time for public employees to fall in line...it's the future.

390:

I was reading comment from member 339 (posted June 28) and purely from my personal associative logic I was reminded of a quotation I read on Facebook today reflecting on Independence Day: "It's a complex fate, being an American--& one of the responsibilities it entails is fighting against a superstitious valuation of Europe." --Henry James

Scott Walker is not my cup of tea. I have friends that consistently vote Republican, often against their own economic interest, seemingly because Republicans are perceived as patriotic and upholding principles of independence from the time of America's founding. I think Walker and others will widen the gap in opportunities for the poor versus the wealthy.

IWD:

From IWD: Getting caught up - September 2012

After surviving a recall vote in Wisconsin, Scott Walker was riding a wave of popularity, and even being talked about as a potential running mate for Mitt Romney. Since his fellow Wisconsonian, Paul Ryan, was tapped to be the vice presidential candidate, Walker has continued to campaign for the ticket. Walker's speech at the Convention was praised by Republicans. About other speakers at the convention, Walker said the Clint Eastwood presentation (where he spoke to an empty chair as if talking to President Obama) made him cringe, and he was videoed being so moved by Paul Ryan's speech that he became teary. Recently, Walker urged Romney to be stonger, bolder, and more specific about his plans to improve the economy, create jobs and solve the nation’s budget deficit.

Wisconsin is considered a swing state that traditionally has voted for Democrats in Presidential elections, but Republicans may feel more optimistic this year having two young political stars from the state.

(The impetus for Walker's recall vote was his successful move to end collective bargaining for public workers in Wisconsin. That issue in still being resolved in court.)

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