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Traditions and Transitions

Introduced: July 04 2015

I've watched the same 4th of July parade for 30 years. On display is a certain brand of pageantry and partriotism -- but just as clearly, it's a chance to view traditions and transitions.

 

Of course, the people in the parade are not the same as they were 30 years ago. The pick-up trucks carrying Little League All-Stars now hold kids that weren't born two or three decades ago. In fact, some of those original players might now be the coaches.

 

At this year's parade, there was an infant dressed in red, white and blue being cradled and sheltered from the sun by, first, grandma then grandad, while mom and dad enjoyed the parade with the baby's big sister. And so the generations take up the traditions of the day -- the parade, then the Little League games, then the cook-outs, then the fireworks. Great Grandma who watches the parade from a lawn chair, used to cradle the infant. Grandma used to be the mom chasing the toddler. The toddler is now a mom herself.

 

As the mother of three grown sons who seldom demonstrate their sentimental side, I've been surprised about some of the things they remember -- and seem to enjoy remembering. Certain traditions comfort us as time passes, buffering some of the consequences of change.

 

Dialogue on Traditions and Transitions
419:

I agree that we have to try to hold on to the traditions that mean the most -- and be willing to give on the others. We now spend most of our holidays traveling from one of our daughter's houses to another. At first I wasn't quite ready to give up my role as organizer/matriarch, but I've learned to just enjoy it as it comes.

419:

I agree that we have to try to hold on to the traditions that mean the most -- and be willing to give on the others. We now spend most of our holidays traveling from one of our daughter's houses to another. At first I wasn't quite ready to give up my role as organizer/matriarch, but I've learned to just enjoy it as it comes.

419:

I agree that we have to try to hold on to the traditions that mean the most -- and be willing to give on the others. We now spend most of our holidays traveling from one of our daughter's houses to another. At first I wasn't quite ready to give up my role as organizer/matriarch, but I've learned to just enjoy it as it comes.

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