topic
U.S. Politics and Women

Introduced: April 04 2012

If past experience is any teacher, is America ready for a woman President or Vice President? What advice would you give a woman candidate you liked about her image, the media, the campaign, and the voters? If a woman ran this year, would she receive "special treatment" from the media and from those who oppose her? If no woman is on the ticket this year, what has to happen for things to change between now and 2016?


 

Dialogue on U.S. Politics and Women
362:

A woman President need not be so farfetched a notion - just 10 years ago Obama's presidency was unimaginable. However, to make it happen we need to challenge the Taliban-like attitudes of old white men in power. The hearings on contraceptive coverage under health care plans could have played as parody (I wish they had been funny instead of enraging!) - really? In 21st Century America? I think the prevalence of pornography and violent images degrade our ability to speak and be heard - sex has become a commodity, not the profound connection between humans that transforms our lives.

048:

Women in politics can take heart if they pay attention to the journey of Hillary Clinton. After all the guff she had to take through the years, she is finally getting the respect and recognition she deserves. A really great tribute to her by Robert Gates in Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World.



Note from IWD: We thought the essay by Robert Gates was worth reproducing here -- and here's also a link to the Time story.


http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2111975_2111976,00.html


"Tough. Indefatigable. Patient. Smart. Knowledgeable. Superior political instincts. Funny. Loyal team player. Finds opportunities in crises and challenges. Skilled global advocate for American interests and American values. That is my job description for U.S. Secretary of State. Fortunately, the job has been filled for the past three-plus years by someone who has all those qualities: Hillary Rodham Clinton.


In a world that is ever more complex, turbulent and dangerous, Secretary Clinton, 64, has made a singular contribution to strengthening this country's relationships with allies, partners and friends; rallying other countries to join us in dealing with challenges to the global order, from Libya and Iran to the South China Sea; and reaching out to people in scores of countries to demonstrate that America cares about them.


She has developed, for the first time, long-range, comprehensive strategies for diplomacy and development that will strengthen the critical civilian contribution to America's national security abroad. We worked closely together to integrate and coordinate the efforts of the departments of State and Defense.


Equally important, Secretary Clinton has been thoughtful and tough-minded about where and how the U.S. should engage its prestige, its resources and its men and women in the field, both civilian and military. She is an idealistic realist and a superb Secretary of State and has well served the President and our country.


Gates is a former Defense Secretary of the U.S. and current chancellor of the College of William and Mary

162:

My advice would be – don’t wear short skirts and don’t wear high red pumps. It just invites people to focus on your clothes instead of your views and your qualifications.



Note from IWD: If you didn’t notice during the 2008 campaign, there was quite a lot of attention paid to Sarah Palin’s red high heels. She chose to wear them, yes she did, but they were photographed over and over and over – and according to the Christian Science Monitor, when she gave them to her niece and her niece sold them on eBay, someone bought them for $2,000.

181:

Once again, we find ourselves scouring the field of candidates for a national election, wondering if any of them might be a woman.



Note from IWD: Two of our Topics crossed paths this week – the Dialogue on Mitt Romney’s running mate intersected with the New Topic of Women in U.S. Politics as people evaluated some of the women being considered for VP. Here’s a link to that dialogue so you can read member responses about potential women VP candidates. http://www.iwdialogue.com/topic/mitt-romneys-running-mate

174:

There are some really awful comments made about candidates – whether they are women or men. I am disgusted that Nikki Haley has had to face insults aimed both at her gender and her ethnic background. It’s like living in the dark ages.

034:

Here’s a link to a good story in the Washington Post called “Why Women Don’t Run for Office.” http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/post/why-women-dont-run-for-political-office/2012/03/25/gIQAXLttZS_blog.html%20

076:

From what I’ve read, a lot of people think that the way politics works is more of a turn-off to women than to men. It’s not the way women like to be treated – and not the way they want to operate. I read that when Nancy Pelosi was running for re-election in the 2010 mid-term elections, there were more than 160,000 negative ads directed toward her, costing more than $65 million. But Nancy Pelosi has toughened up through the years. Supposedly she said the that all that attention was a testament to her role in passing the Democrats’ agenda as Speaker of the House.



Note from IWD: The facts about women who serve in the Congress are that 17 women — 12 Democrats, five Republicans — now serve in the Senate. That’s a record and has held steady since 2009. Two of them are retiring this year (Olympia Snowe from Maine and Kay Bailey Hutchinson from Texas). In the house, the percentage of women serving is just 16.8%. According to a recent study, that percentage puts the U.S. as 78th in the world, tied with Turkmenistan. There are a number of national organizations working to attract women to politics and prepare them for campaigns. Rutgers University’s Center for American Women and Politics http://www.cawp.rutgers.edu/is taking a leadership role in this effort.

033:

When Jack Cafferty on CNN asked “What will it take for a woman to be elected President?” someone commented that it will take people hating whoever is the current president enough to forget their biases. But I don’t think that’s true. I think it’s a perception problem and people sub-consciously don’t think a woman “looks” or “acts” (or even dresses) like the Presidents they’re used to. A softer voice, a higher voice, an actual “hairstyle” (among male candidates, only John Edwards had comments about his hairstyle…), more attention to good hair days and bad hair days, etc. I think it’s a really huge subliminal problem and no matter how you try to attack it on the surface, you don’t get people to change.

050:

I think women have to be the one to change things – and stop being so hyper-critical of women who run for office. Agree to disagree on issues, instead of all the venom.

035:

It would help if someone would suggest to the media that they stop pointing out whether or not a candidate has “cankles.” I bet some of the male candidates aren’t perfect either.

362:

A woman President need not be so farfetched a notion - just 10 years ago Obama's presidency was unimaginable. However, to make it happen we need to challenge the Taliban-like attitudes of old white men in power. The hearings on contraceptive coverage under health care plans could have played as parody (I wish they had been funny instead of enraging!) - really? In 21st Century America? I think the prevalence of pornography and violent images degrade our ability to speak and be heard - sex has become a commodity, not the profound connection between humans that transforms our lives.

048:

Women in politics can take heart if they pay attention to the journey of Hillary Clinton. After all the guff she had to take through the years, she is finally getting the respect and recognition she deserves. A really great tribute to her by Robert Gates in Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World.



Note from IWD: We thought the essay by Robert Gates was worth reproducing here -- and here's also a link to the Time story.


http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2111975_2111976,00.html


"Tough. Indefatigable. Patient. Smart. Knowledgeable. Superior political instincts. Funny. Loyal team player. Finds opportunities in crises and challenges. Skilled global advocate for American interests and American values. That is my job description for U.S. Secretary of State. Fortunately, the job has been filled for the past three-plus years by someone who has all those qualities: Hillary Rodham Clinton.


In a world that is ever more complex, turbulent and dangerous, Secretary Clinton, 64, has made a singular contribution to strengthening this country's relationships with allies, partners and friends; rallying other countries to join us in dealing with challenges to the global order, from Libya and Iran to the South China Sea; and reaching out to people in scores of countries to demonstrate that America cares about them.


She has developed, for the first time, long-range, comprehensive strategies for diplomacy and development that will strengthen the critical civilian contribution to America's national security abroad. We worked closely together to integrate and coordinate the efforts of the departments of State and Defense.


Equally important, Secretary Clinton has been thoughtful and tough-minded about where and how the U.S. should engage its prestige, its resources and its men and women in the field, both civilian and military. She is an idealistic realist and a superb Secretary of State and has well served the President and our country.


Gates is a former Defense Secretary of the U.S. and current chancellor of the College of William and Mary

162:

My advice would be – don’t wear short skirts and don’t wear high red pumps. It just invites people to focus on your clothes instead of your views and your qualifications.



Note from IWD: If you didn’t notice during the 2008 campaign, there was quite a lot of attention paid to Sarah Palin’s red high heels. She chose to wear them, yes she did, but they were photographed over and over and over – and according to the Christian Science Monitor, when she gave them to her niece and her niece sold them on eBay, someone bought them for $2,000.

181:

Once again, we find ourselves scouring the field of candidates for a national election, wondering if any of them might be a woman.



Note from IWD: Two of our Topics crossed paths this week – the Dialogue on Mitt Romney’s running mate intersected with the New Topic of Women in U.S. Politics as people evaluated some of the women being considered for VP. Here’s a link to that dialogue so you can read member responses about potential women VP candidates. http://www.iwdialogue.com/topic/mitt-romneys-running-mate

174:

There are some really awful comments made about candidates – whether they are women or men. I am disgusted that Nikki Haley has had to face insults aimed both at her gender and her ethnic background. It’s like living in the dark ages.

034:

Here’s a link to a good story in the Washington Post called “Why Women Don’t Run for Office.” http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/post/why-women-dont-run-for-political-office/2012/03/25/gIQAXLttZS_blog.html%20

076:

From what I’ve read, a lot of people think that the way politics works is more of a turn-off to women than to men. It’s not the way women like to be treated – and not the way they want to operate. I read that when Nancy Pelosi was running for re-election in the 2010 mid-term elections, there were more than 160,000 negative ads directed toward her, costing more than $65 million. But Nancy Pelosi has toughened up through the years. Supposedly she said the that all that attention was a testament to her role in passing the Democrats’ agenda as Speaker of the House.



Note from IWD: The facts about women who serve in the Congress are that 17 women — 12 Democrats, five Republicans — now serve in the Senate. That’s a record and has held steady since 2009. Two of them are retiring this year (Olympia Snowe from Maine and Kay Bailey Hutchinson from Texas). In the house, the percentage of women serving is just 16.8%. According to a recent study, that percentage puts the U.S. as 78th in the world, tied with Turkmenistan. There are a number of national organizations working to attract women to politics and prepare them for campaigns. Rutgers University’s Center for American Women and Politics http://www.cawp.rutgers.edu/is taking a leadership role in this effort.

033:

When Jack Cafferty on CNN asked “What will it take for a woman to be elected President?” someone commented that it will take people hating whoever is the current president enough to forget their biases. But I don’t think that’s true. I think it’s a perception problem and people sub-consciously don’t think a woman “looks” or “acts” (or even dresses) like the Presidents they’re used to. A softer voice, a higher voice, an actual “hairstyle” (among male candidates, only John Edwards had comments about his hairstyle…), more attention to good hair days and bad hair days, etc. I think it’s a really huge subliminal problem and no matter how you try to attack it on the surface, you don’t get people to change.

050:

I think women have to be the one to change things – and stop being so hyper-critical of women who run for office. Agree to disagree on issues, instead of all the venom.

035:

It would help if someone would suggest to the media that they stop pointing out whether or not a candidate has “cankles.” I bet some of the male candidates aren’t perfect either.

035:

It would help if someone would suggest to the media that they stop pointing out whether or not a candidate has “cankles.” I bet some of the male candidates aren’t perfect either.

050:

I think women have to be the one to change things – and stop being so hyper-critical of women who run for office. Agree to disagree on issues, instead of all the venom.

033:

When Jack Cafferty on CNN asked “What will it take for a woman to be elected President?” someone commented that it will take people hating whoever is the current president enough to forget their biases. But I don’t think that’s true. I think it’s a perception problem and people sub-consciously don’t think a woman “looks” or “acts” (or even dresses) like the Presidents they’re used to. A softer voice, a higher voice, an actual “hairstyle” (among male candidates, only John Edwards had comments about his hairstyle…), more attention to good hair days and bad hair days, etc. I think it’s a really huge subliminal problem and no matter how you try to attack it on the surface, you don’t get people to change.

076:

From what I’ve read, a lot of people think that the way politics works is more of a turn-off to women than to men. It’s not the way women like to be treated – and not the way they want to operate. I read that when Nancy Pelosi was running for re-election in the 2010 mid-term elections, there were more than 160,000 negative ads directed toward her, costing more than $65 million. But Nancy Pelosi has toughened up through the years. Supposedly she said the that all that attention was a testament to her role in passing the Democrats’ agenda as Speaker of the House.



Note from IWD: The facts about women who serve in the Congress are that 17 women — 12 Democrats, five Republicans — now serve in the Senate. That’s a record and has held steady since 2009. Two of them are retiring this year (Olympia Snowe from Maine and Kay Bailey Hutchinson from Texas). In the house, the percentage of women serving is just 16.8%. According to a recent study, that percentage puts the U.S. as 78th in the world, tied with Turkmenistan. There are a number of national organizations working to attract women to politics and prepare them for campaigns. Rutgers University’s Center for American Women and Politics http://www.cawp.rutgers.edu/is taking a leadership role in this effort.

034:

Here’s a link to a good story in the Washington Post called “Why Women Don’t Run for Office.” http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/post/why-women-dont-run-for-political-office/2012/03/25/gIQAXLttZS_blog.html%20

174:

There are some really awful comments made about candidates – whether they are women or men. I am disgusted that Nikki Haley has had to face insults aimed both at her gender and her ethnic background. It’s like living in the dark ages.

181:

Once again, we find ourselves scouring the field of candidates for a national election, wondering if any of them might be a woman.



Note from IWD: Two of our Topics crossed paths this week – the Dialogue on Mitt Romney’s running mate intersected with the New Topic of Women in U.S. Politics as people evaluated some of the women being considered for VP. Here’s a link to that dialogue so you can read member responses about potential women VP candidates. http://www.iwdialogue.com/topic/mitt-romneys-running-mate

162:

My advice would be – don’t wear short skirts and don’t wear high red pumps. It just invites people to focus on your clothes instead of your views and your qualifications.



Note from IWD: If you didn’t notice during the 2008 campaign, there was quite a lot of attention paid to Sarah Palin’s red high heels. She chose to wear them, yes she did, but they were photographed over and over and over – and according to the Christian Science Monitor, when she gave them to her niece and her niece sold them on eBay, someone bought them for $2,000.

048:

Women in politics can take heart if they pay attention to the journey of Hillary Clinton. After all the guff she had to take through the years, she is finally getting the respect and recognition she deserves. A really great tribute to her by Robert Gates in Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World.



Note from IWD: We thought the essay by Robert Gates was worth reproducing here -- and here's also a link to the Time story.


http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2111975_2111976,00.html


"Tough. Indefatigable. Patient. Smart. Knowledgeable. Superior political instincts. Funny. Loyal team player. Finds opportunities in crises and challenges. Skilled global advocate for American interests and American values. That is my job description for U.S. Secretary of State. Fortunately, the job has been filled for the past three-plus years by someone who has all those qualities: Hillary Rodham Clinton.


In a world that is ever more complex, turbulent and dangerous, Secretary Clinton, 64, has made a singular contribution to strengthening this country's relationships with allies, partners and friends; rallying other countries to join us in dealing with challenges to the global order, from Libya and Iran to the South China Sea; and reaching out to people in scores of countries to demonstrate that America cares about them.


She has developed, for the first time, long-range, comprehensive strategies for diplomacy and development that will strengthen the critical civilian contribution to America's national security abroad. We worked closely together to integrate and coordinate the efforts of the departments of State and Defense.


Equally important, Secretary Clinton has been thoughtful and tough-minded about where and how the U.S. should engage its prestige, its resources and its men and women in the field, both civilian and military. She is an idealistic realist and a superb Secretary of State and has well served the President and our country.


Gates is a former Defense Secretary of the U.S. and current chancellor of the College of William and Mary

362:

A woman President need not be so farfetched a notion - just 10 years ago Obama's presidency was unimaginable. However, to make it happen we need to challenge the Taliban-like attitudes of old white men in power. The hearings on contraceptive coverage under health care plans could have played as parody (I wish they had been funny instead of enraging!) - really? In 21st Century America? I think the prevalence of pornography and violent images degrade our ability to speak and be heard - sex has become a commodity, not the profound connection between humans that transforms our lives.

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