topic
Voting Like "A Woman"

Introduced: September 09 2012

The campaign strategy of both parties seems to include "winning women" but they have different interpretations of what matters to women. Do they know what's on your mind? Republicans are stressing that women, who are typically the "CFOs" of their households, care most about jobs and the economy. The Democrats see a special set of issues that are important to women, including female-friendly government policies and legislation, such as equal pay for women and the right to make decisions about our own health care. With less than two months left before we vote, what matters most to you?

Dialogue on Voting Like "A Woman"
224:

Like many people, like many women, I suppose – I feel a growing distress about the choice we face in the Presidential election. I was beginning to think that maybe I could cross the aisle and vote for Mitt Romney this year. I think he’s a decent man who has proven his business acumen. There was a time when he was happily called “moderate,” and I had been hoping those impulses might serve him well once elected. I think he might have some answers for our economy and a lot of brilliant financial minds around him to pull our economy back up by the bootstraps. So if that makes me a “financial conservative,” that is a label I’m willing to wear, if I have the right to change that label if I decide to in the future. I agree with Republicans that “women” care about the economy getting back on track. But, then Romney goes and chooses Paul Ryan – whose views about social issues don’t resonate with me AT ALL. Radically anti abortion and an “avid hunter” and gun rights supporter to boot. And the Democrats are right…I care deeply about the social issues that affect our quality of life. What choice am I left with? As a financial conservative and a social liberal…where in the heck do I go with this election?

As I was pondering this dilemma, I came upon this essay by Peggy Noonan in the Wall Street Journal – and do you know what? Her take on America and what we need (an election and candidates that actually are passionate about what they believe in), stirs me more than any of the candidates’ speeches. Peggy Noonan for President? http://blogs.wsj.com/peggynoonan/2012/09/18/time-for-an-intervention/?mod=e2tw

311:

It seems the parties have taken significantly different approaches. The Democrats are finding and emphasizing the issues that appeal to a certain group – like health care for women and immigration for Hispanics – while the Democrats are folding both of those groups into their main platform, repeatedly saying “Women are concerned most about economy, the future of their children, etc.” and “Hispanics are concerned most about the economy, the future of their children, etc.”

Note from IWD: According to Dianne Bystrom, the director of the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University, the reason the gender gap is so important isn’t the popularity points, but the fact that more women are registered to vote than men in most states, and a much higher female turnout rate at the polls. In the 2008 election, 60.4% of the female population over the age of 18 showed up at the polls, slightly less than 56% of men voted. Here’s how that turns out mathematically: 10 million more women than men voted. In the battleground states, where the consensus is that the election will be won, women voters outnumber men in every swing state except Nevada.

How have women voted in recent elections? In 2008, Mr. Obama won the support of both men and women in Ohio and Florida, though the gap was narrower among men. Nationally, Mr. Obama won the female vote 56 percent to 43 percent in 2008. In 2004, Democrat John Kerry carried the female vote nationally, 51 percent to 48 percent, though he lost the election to George W. Bush. Read more in this article in Forbes: http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghancasserly/2012/06/07/election-2012-mitt-romney-obama-women-battleground-states/

250:

There are a lot of distractions in this election, but I am most interested in a President who can repair our economy and I think Mitt Romney is the person to do that.

264:

I hear most of the newscasters talking about what women want and they say it’s either the economy or typically female issues – reproductive health, equal pay, etc. but I am also very interested in America’s place in the world. I am interested in us not entering another war – and I’m interested in policy that realistically addresses the changing dynamics of government and leadership in other countries. I am worried about U.S. leaders who underestimate the trickiness of international diplomacy. I see that naiveté in criticisms Republicans make about the way the Obama administration handles situations in the Middle East. It seems to me they look at things more in black and white than they really. I could borrow words from Ann Romney "This is heard. You get in the ring and try it." So, I basically don't put much faith in Republican's criticisms of current foreign policy.

133:

Here comes a generalization – but I think generally women tend to care about what’s happening to others around them. And a lot of women have been passed over or condescended to by the old boys network of successful, powerful men. Hearing Romney talk negatively about people who aren’t necessarily “successful” – aren’t necessarily at the top of their game – seemed to have an air or arrogance. Just as high-powered men feel comfortable with Romney because he is “one of them” – many women still feel they’re not members of that exclusive club.

070:

It’s interesting to watch mostly male politicians try to get into the heads of women. While current politicians were pondering that, I came upon an interesting piece from the Natural Women’s History Museum, talking about women’s voting patterns since women won the vote 92 years ago on August 26. http://www.nwhm.org/blog/2012/08/ The article cites another article that appeared in The Journal of Politics explaining why for several decades after the 19th amendment was passed, women didn’t have a very good turnout at the polls. The explanation is that women of that time were convinced they were “unsuited for politics.” Once they started voting, tho, their numbers grew and by 1980 women voters outnumbered men voters, and it has remained that way ever since. During the last Presidential election, approximately 70 million women voted as opposed to 60 million men.

210:

I know Intelligent Women Dialogue is unbiased, but I don’t have to be, right? So rather than try to tell you what’s on my mind this elections, I’ll refer you to this book: 52 reasons to vote for Obama. By Bernard Whitman. Here’s an example of the content. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bernard-whitman/reason-23-equal-pay-for-w_b_1819376.html

224:

Like many people, like many women, I suppose – I feel a growing distress about the choice we face in the Presidential election. I was beginning to think that maybe I could cross the aisle and vote for Mitt Romney this year. I think he’s a decent man who has proven his business acumen. There was a time when he was happily called “moderate,” and I had been hoping those impulses might serve him well once elected. I think he might have some answers for our economy and a lot of brilliant financial minds around him to pull our economy back up by the bootstraps. So if that makes me a “financial conservative,” that is a label I’m willing to wear, if I have the right to change that label if I decide to in the future. I agree with Republicans that “women” care about the economy getting back on track. But, then Romney goes and chooses Paul Ryan – whose views about social issues don’t resonate with me AT ALL. Radically anti abortion and an “avid hunter” and gun rights supporter to boot. And the Democrats are right…I care deeply about the social issues that affect our quality of life. What choice am I left with? As a financial conservative and a social liberal…where in the heck do I go with this election?

As I was pondering this dilemma, I came upon this essay by Peggy Noonan in the Wall Street Journal – and do you know what? Her take on America and what we need (an election and candidates that actually are passionate about what they believe in), stirs me more than any of the candidates’ speeches. Peggy Noonan for President? http://blogs.wsj.com/peggynoonan/2012/09/18/time-for-an-intervention/?mod=e2tw

311:

It seems the parties have taken significantly different approaches. The Democrats are finding and emphasizing the issues that appeal to a certain group – like health care for women and immigration for Hispanics – while the Democrats are folding both of those groups into their main platform, repeatedly saying “Women are concerned most about economy, the future of their children, etc.” and “Hispanics are concerned most about the economy, the future of their children, etc.”

Note from IWD: According to Dianne Bystrom, the director of the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University, the reason the gender gap is so important isn’t the popularity points, but the fact that more women are registered to vote than men in most states, and a much higher female turnout rate at the polls. In the 2008 election, 60.4% of the female population over the age of 18 showed up at the polls, slightly less than 56% of men voted. Here’s how that turns out mathematically: 10 million more women than men voted. In the battleground states, where the consensus is that the election will be won, women voters outnumber men in every swing state except Nevada.

How have women voted in recent elections? In 2008, Mr. Obama won the support of both men and women in Ohio and Florida, though the gap was narrower among men. Nationally, Mr. Obama won the female vote 56 percent to 43 percent in 2008. In 2004, Democrat John Kerry carried the female vote nationally, 51 percent to 48 percent, though he lost the election to George W. Bush. Read more in this article in Forbes: http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghancasserly/2012/06/07/election-2012-mitt-romney-obama-women-battleground-states/

250:

There are a lot of distractions in this election, but I am most interested in a President who can repair our economy and I think Mitt Romney is the person to do that.

264:

I hear most of the newscasters talking about what women want and they say it’s either the economy or typically female issues – reproductive health, equal pay, etc. but I am also very interested in America’s place in the world. I am interested in us not entering another war – and I’m interested in policy that realistically addresses the changing dynamics of government and leadership in other countries. I am worried about U.S. leaders who underestimate the trickiness of international diplomacy. I see that naiveté in criticisms Republicans make about the way the Obama administration handles situations in the Middle East. It seems to me they look at things more in black and white than they really. I could borrow words from Ann Romney "This is heard. You get in the ring and try it." So, I basically don't put much faith in Republican's criticisms of current foreign policy.

133:

Here comes a generalization – but I think generally women tend to care about what’s happening to others around them. And a lot of women have been passed over or condescended to by the old boys network of successful, powerful men. Hearing Romney talk negatively about people who aren’t necessarily “successful” – aren’t necessarily at the top of their game – seemed to have an air or arrogance. Just as high-powered men feel comfortable with Romney because he is “one of them” – many women still feel they’re not members of that exclusive club.

070:

It’s interesting to watch mostly male politicians try to get into the heads of women. While current politicians were pondering that, I came upon an interesting piece from the Natural Women’s History Museum, talking about women’s voting patterns since women won the vote 92 years ago on August 26. http://www.nwhm.org/blog/2012/08/ The article cites another article that appeared in The Journal of Politics explaining why for several decades after the 19th amendment was passed, women didn’t have a very good turnout at the polls. The explanation is that women of that time were convinced they were “unsuited for politics.” Once they started voting, tho, their numbers grew and by 1980 women voters outnumbered men voters, and it has remained that way ever since. During the last Presidential election, approximately 70 million women voted as opposed to 60 million men.

210:

I know Intelligent Women Dialogue is unbiased, but I don’t have to be, right? So rather than try to tell you what’s on my mind this elections, I’ll refer you to this book: 52 reasons to vote for Obama. By Bernard Whitman. Here’s an example of the content. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bernard-whitman/reason-23-equal-pay-for-w_b_1819376.html

210:

I know Intelligent Women Dialogue is unbiased, but I don’t have to be, right? So rather than try to tell you what’s on my mind this elections, I’ll refer you to this book: 52 reasons to vote for Obama. By Bernard Whitman. Here’s an example of the content. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bernard-whitman/reason-23-equal-pay-for-w_b_1819376.html

070:

It’s interesting to watch mostly male politicians try to get into the heads of women. While current politicians were pondering that, I came upon an interesting piece from the Natural Women’s History Museum, talking about women’s voting patterns since women won the vote 92 years ago on August 26. http://www.nwhm.org/blog/2012/08/ The article cites another article that appeared in The Journal of Politics explaining why for several decades after the 19th amendment was passed, women didn’t have a very good turnout at the polls. The explanation is that women of that time were convinced they were “unsuited for politics.” Once they started voting, tho, their numbers grew and by 1980 women voters outnumbered men voters, and it has remained that way ever since. During the last Presidential election, approximately 70 million women voted as opposed to 60 million men.

133:

Here comes a generalization – but I think generally women tend to care about what’s happening to others around them. And a lot of women have been passed over or condescended to by the old boys network of successful, powerful men. Hearing Romney talk negatively about people who aren’t necessarily “successful” – aren’t necessarily at the top of their game – seemed to have an air or arrogance. Just as high-powered men feel comfortable with Romney because he is “one of them” – many women still feel they’re not members of that exclusive club.

264:

I hear most of the newscasters talking about what women want and they say it’s either the economy or typically female issues – reproductive health, equal pay, etc. but I am also very interested in America’s place in the world. I am interested in us not entering another war – and I’m interested in policy that realistically addresses the changing dynamics of government and leadership in other countries. I am worried about U.S. leaders who underestimate the trickiness of international diplomacy. I see that naiveté in criticisms Republicans make about the way the Obama administration handles situations in the Middle East. It seems to me they look at things more in black and white than they really. I could borrow words from Ann Romney "This is heard. You get in the ring and try it." So, I basically don't put much faith in Republican's criticisms of current foreign policy.

250:

There are a lot of distractions in this election, but I am most interested in a President who can repair our economy and I think Mitt Romney is the person to do that.

311:

It seems the parties have taken significantly different approaches. The Democrats are finding and emphasizing the issues that appeal to a certain group – like health care for women and immigration for Hispanics – while the Democrats are folding both of those groups into their main platform, repeatedly saying “Women are concerned most about economy, the future of their children, etc.” and “Hispanics are concerned most about the economy, the future of their children, etc.”

Note from IWD: According to Dianne Bystrom, the director of the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University, the reason the gender gap is so important isn’t the popularity points, but the fact that more women are registered to vote than men in most states, and a much higher female turnout rate at the polls. In the 2008 election, 60.4% of the female population over the age of 18 showed up at the polls, slightly less than 56% of men voted. Here’s how that turns out mathematically: 10 million more women than men voted. In the battleground states, where the consensus is that the election will be won, women voters outnumber men in every swing state except Nevada.

How have women voted in recent elections? In 2008, Mr. Obama won the support of both men and women in Ohio and Florida, though the gap was narrower among men. Nationally, Mr. Obama won the female vote 56 percent to 43 percent in 2008. In 2004, Democrat John Kerry carried the female vote nationally, 51 percent to 48 percent, though he lost the election to George W. Bush. Read more in this article in Forbes: http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghancasserly/2012/06/07/election-2012-mitt-romney-obama-women-battleground-states/

224:

Like many people, like many women, I suppose – I feel a growing distress about the choice we face in the Presidential election. I was beginning to think that maybe I could cross the aisle and vote for Mitt Romney this year. I think he’s a decent man who has proven his business acumen. There was a time when he was happily called “moderate,” and I had been hoping those impulses might serve him well once elected. I think he might have some answers for our economy and a lot of brilliant financial minds around him to pull our economy back up by the bootstraps. So if that makes me a “financial conservative,” that is a label I’m willing to wear, if I have the right to change that label if I decide to in the future. I agree with Republicans that “women” care about the economy getting back on track. But, then Romney goes and chooses Paul Ryan – whose views about social issues don’t resonate with me AT ALL. Radically anti abortion and an “avid hunter” and gun rights supporter to boot. And the Democrats are right…I care deeply about the social issues that affect our quality of life. What choice am I left with? As a financial conservative and a social liberal…where in the heck do I go with this election?

As I was pondering this dilemma, I came upon this essay by Peggy Noonan in the Wall Street Journal – and do you know what? Her take on America and what we need (an election and candidates that actually are passionate about what they believe in), stirs me more than any of the candidates’ speeches. Peggy Noonan for President? http://blogs.wsj.com/peggynoonan/2012/09/18/time-for-an-intervention/?mod=e2tw

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