topic
What Matters to You?

Introduced: May 09 2012

What do you try to stay current on during the day? -- and what keeps you awake at night? Is it the environment, the election, the economy, health, safety, society, your children's future  or...??? If you tell IWD what matters to you, we'll get some dialogue started. 

Dialogue on What Matters to You?
239:

I've been thinking what it means for Americans to blend ever since I read the comment on the IWD topic of What Matters to You Most. (from Member 31) Since I am a person who likes very much to cook -- I have to think of it as a metaphor. When we blend, is it more like a sauce -- when you really can't recognize the ingredients? Or more like a stew, where each retains some shape and flavor. I hope it's possible for us to live together while retaining our cultural identity. But it will take some effort.

114:

ALL OF THE ABOVE. ("...the environment, the election, the economy, health, safety, society, your children's future...") I try to stay current via the various news cable shows (left & right!). There is always a news cable station on in the background or alerts on my computer. The coming election is very important as our country goes forward; hopefully, with the spirit and compromise and open-mindedness as our focus.

060:

An interesting question posed by Member 31 -- what happens as we continue to "blend"? Having grown up among "the majority" -- I find that I notice more and more feeling like a "minority" in crowds. And having so many people speak English with an accent -- and depending on where you travel, having a second language treated so equally. It seems that the most charitable response is acceptance -- but I sometimes worry about where it all will lead.

076:

I had just finished reading the comments in IWD when I picked up the New York Times and started reading about Syria. (link) Reportedly, the recent massacre that killed 108 people was committed by "thugs" who are Alawites, the minority sect to which President Bashar al-Assad belongs. We are lucky that tribes or sects in the U.S. are important to maintaining a colorful culture, but don't cause us to slaughter each other. Maybe that is one of the things that makes America unique -- somehow, over the years, we have found a way to blur our differences. I agree it's interesting to ponder these questions.

066:

I look at the problems of our society and wonder how they will ever be solved. Why is there so little discussion about the drug problem that faces every socieo-ecomonic group in this country? This seems to be at the base of poverty, gangs, dropouts, accidents and more. It robs children of their parents. If a child has no love and guidance there chance of succeeding are negligible. Until there is a successful war on drugs there is little hope on saving many of our citizens.

031:

As we become more connected globally, more overlap of peoples from different corners of the earth, and there is more blending, more "mixed marriages," blurred lines between our differences, more distance from our unique ethnic heritage and family history... in a future century, will all humans start to look like one another?
We may end up with less tribal warfare, but what will we lose in not having tribes as a societal structure?

(Please note, this does not "keep me up at night"! I actually worry about very little these days. But I do muse about the future, just as mental exercise.)

321:

I am concerned about the shifting demographics of the world's population and the U.S. population. I read that the U.S. is becoming a nation of younger minorities and older whites -- and that's going to take a whole lot of understanding and acceptance.

060:

In between other concerns, I am trying to learn to accept (and appreciate) that the world is changing and and trying to be open to inevitable change and not so caught up in my own immediate world that I fail to participate in a bigger sense.

015:

Getting a good night's sleep -- and NOT thinking about serious things in the middle of the night!

265:

I'd like to have somebody figure out how to break the cycle of poverty for children who didn't get to choose who they were born to. Adults should not be given a free ride (unrestrained welfare) but kids should not be the ones who suffer. I am very concerned that when the mood of the country pits the haves against the have nots, that there is a growing feeling that all people who require assistance from the government are at fault for their situation. Even if you think you can make that case for the adults, you can't blame the children. I was having a discussion the other day with someone who was saying that the right to have children should be based on one's ability to support them financially. Pretty radical, I thought -- and unenforceable, of course.

245:

I'll contribute three things that DON'T matter to me: Anything to do with the Kardashians, what Mitt Romney did in high school, and what John Travolta did or didn't do with massage therapists. C'mon news media...get off it.

308:

I'm beginning to feel more optimistic about the economy - but I've given up counting on the stock market to tell me which direction we're heading, because the swings and twists and turns only produce more anxiety.

224:

Jobs and the economic recovery. I want optimism and opportunity to return to the U.S.

233:

Seeing my children develop resilience and a healthy perspective on themselves and their world -- I'm really concentrating on that. Whether it's economic challenges or health challenges, I think the next generation will need to be good problem-solvers and flexible thinkers, with emotional, physical and mental strength.

118:

As we watch and wait for the actual end of our military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan, I am hoping that we find a way to take care of our veterans. I read the other day that in addition to all the loss of limbs and the traumatic brain injury, they are now finding that our veterans who were exposed to explosions -- even one time -- may have a higher risk of early onset dementia.

034:

What matters to me is that we somehow find a way to beat cancer. It seems we have made headway on diagnosing and treating it -- but I'm hoping that somebody can come up with a better understanding of what causes it and what in our environment might be triggering it.

239:

I've been thinking what it means for Americans to blend ever since I read the comment on the IWD topic of What Matters to You Most. (from Member 31) Since I am a person who likes very much to cook -- I have to think of it as a metaphor. When we blend, is it more like a sauce -- when you really can't recognize the ingredients? Or more like a stew, where each retains some shape and flavor. I hope it's possible for us to live together while retaining our cultural identity. But it will take some effort.

114:

ALL OF THE ABOVE. ("...the environment, the election, the economy, health, safety, society, your children's future...") I try to stay current via the various news cable shows (left & right!). There is always a news cable station on in the background or alerts on my computer. The coming election is very important as our country goes forward; hopefully, with the spirit and compromise and open-mindedness as our focus.

060:

An interesting question posed by Member 31 -- what happens as we continue to "blend"? Having grown up among "the majority" -- I find that I notice more and more feeling like a "minority" in crowds. And having so many people speak English with an accent -- and depending on where you travel, having a second language treated so equally. It seems that the most charitable response is acceptance -- but I sometimes worry about where it all will lead.

076:

I had just finished reading the comments in IWD when I picked up the New York Times and started reading about Syria. (link) Reportedly, the recent massacre that killed 108 people was committed by "thugs" who are Alawites, the minority sect to which President Bashar al-Assad belongs. We are lucky that tribes or sects in the U.S. are important to maintaining a colorful culture, but don't cause us to slaughter each other. Maybe that is one of the things that makes America unique -- somehow, over the years, we have found a way to blur our differences. I agree it's interesting to ponder these questions.

066:

I look at the problems of our society and wonder how they will ever be solved. Why is there so little discussion about the drug problem that faces every socieo-ecomonic group in this country? This seems to be at the base of poverty, gangs, dropouts, accidents and more. It robs children of their parents. If a child has no love and guidance there chance of succeeding are negligible. Until there is a successful war on drugs there is little hope on saving many of our citizens.

031:

As we become more connected globally, more overlap of peoples from different corners of the earth, and there is more blending, more "mixed marriages," blurred lines between our differences, more distance from our unique ethnic heritage and family history... in a future century, will all humans start to look like one another?
We may end up with less tribal warfare, but what will we lose in not having tribes as a societal structure?

(Please note, this does not "keep me up at night"! I actually worry about very little these days. But I do muse about the future, just as mental exercise.)

321:

I am concerned about the shifting demographics of the world's population and the U.S. population. I read that the U.S. is becoming a nation of younger minorities and older whites -- and that's going to take a whole lot of understanding and acceptance.

060:

In between other concerns, I am trying to learn to accept (and appreciate) that the world is changing and and trying to be open to inevitable change and not so caught up in my own immediate world that I fail to participate in a bigger sense.

015:

Getting a good night's sleep -- and NOT thinking about serious things in the middle of the night!

265:

I'd like to have somebody figure out how to break the cycle of poverty for children who didn't get to choose who they were born to. Adults should not be given a free ride (unrestrained welfare) but kids should not be the ones who suffer. I am very concerned that when the mood of the country pits the haves against the have nots, that there is a growing feeling that all people who require assistance from the government are at fault for their situation. Even if you think you can make that case for the adults, you can't blame the children. I was having a discussion the other day with someone who was saying that the right to have children should be based on one's ability to support them financially. Pretty radical, I thought -- and unenforceable, of course.

245:

I'll contribute three things that DON'T matter to me: Anything to do with the Kardashians, what Mitt Romney did in high school, and what John Travolta did or didn't do with massage therapists. C'mon news media...get off it.

308:

I'm beginning to feel more optimistic about the economy - but I've given up counting on the stock market to tell me which direction we're heading, because the swings and twists and turns only produce more anxiety.

224:

Jobs and the economic recovery. I want optimism and opportunity to return to the U.S.

233:

Seeing my children develop resilience and a healthy perspective on themselves and their world -- I'm really concentrating on that. Whether it's economic challenges or health challenges, I think the next generation will need to be good problem-solvers and flexible thinkers, with emotional, physical and mental strength.

118:

As we watch and wait for the actual end of our military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan, I am hoping that we find a way to take care of our veterans. I read the other day that in addition to all the loss of limbs and the traumatic brain injury, they are now finding that our veterans who were exposed to explosions -- even one time -- may have a higher risk of early onset dementia.

034:

What matters to me is that we somehow find a way to beat cancer. It seems we have made headway on diagnosing and treating it -- but I'm hoping that somebody can come up with a better understanding of what causes it and what in our environment might be triggering it.

034:

What matters to me is that we somehow find a way to beat cancer. It seems we have made headway on diagnosing and treating it -- but I'm hoping that somebody can come up with a better understanding of what causes it and what in our environment might be triggering it.

118:

As we watch and wait for the actual end of our military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan, I am hoping that we find a way to take care of our veterans. I read the other day that in addition to all the loss of limbs and the traumatic brain injury, they are now finding that our veterans who were exposed to explosions -- even one time -- may have a higher risk of early onset dementia.

233:

Seeing my children develop resilience and a healthy perspective on themselves and their world -- I'm really concentrating on that. Whether it's economic challenges or health challenges, I think the next generation will need to be good problem-solvers and flexible thinkers, with emotional, physical and mental strength.

224:

Jobs and the economic recovery. I want optimism and opportunity to return to the U.S.

308:

I'm beginning to feel more optimistic about the economy - but I've given up counting on the stock market to tell me which direction we're heading, because the swings and twists and turns only produce more anxiety.

245:

I'll contribute three things that DON'T matter to me: Anything to do with the Kardashians, what Mitt Romney did in high school, and what John Travolta did or didn't do with massage therapists. C'mon news media...get off it.

265:

I'd like to have somebody figure out how to break the cycle of poverty for children who didn't get to choose who they were born to. Adults should not be given a free ride (unrestrained welfare) but kids should not be the ones who suffer. I am very concerned that when the mood of the country pits the haves against the have nots, that there is a growing feeling that all people who require assistance from the government are at fault for their situation. Even if you think you can make that case for the adults, you can't blame the children. I was having a discussion the other day with someone who was saying that the right to have children should be based on one's ability to support them financially. Pretty radical, I thought -- and unenforceable, of course.

015:

Getting a good night's sleep -- and NOT thinking about serious things in the middle of the night!

060:

In between other concerns, I am trying to learn to accept (and appreciate) that the world is changing and and trying to be open to inevitable change and not so caught up in my own immediate world that I fail to participate in a bigger sense.

321:

I am concerned about the shifting demographics of the world's population and the U.S. population. I read that the U.S. is becoming a nation of younger minorities and older whites -- and that's going to take a whole lot of understanding and acceptance.

031:

As we become more connected globally, more overlap of peoples from different corners of the earth, and there is more blending, more "mixed marriages," blurred lines between our differences, more distance from our unique ethnic heritage and family history... in a future century, will all humans start to look like one another?
We may end up with less tribal warfare, but what will we lose in not having tribes as a societal structure?

(Please note, this does not "keep me up at night"! I actually worry about very little these days. But I do muse about the future, just as mental exercise.)

066:

I look at the problems of our society and wonder how they will ever be solved. Why is there so little discussion about the drug problem that faces every socieo-ecomonic group in this country? This seems to be at the base of poverty, gangs, dropouts, accidents and more. It robs children of their parents. If a child has no love and guidance there chance of succeeding are negligible. Until there is a successful war on drugs there is little hope on saving many of our citizens.

076:

I had just finished reading the comments in IWD when I picked up the New York Times and started reading about Syria. (link) Reportedly, the recent massacre that killed 108 people was committed by "thugs" who are Alawites, the minority sect to which President Bashar al-Assad belongs. We are lucky that tribes or sects in the U.S. are important to maintaining a colorful culture, but don't cause us to slaughter each other. Maybe that is one of the things that makes America unique -- somehow, over the years, we have found a way to blur our differences. I agree it's interesting to ponder these questions.

060:

An interesting question posed by Member 31 -- what happens as we continue to "blend"? Having grown up among "the majority" -- I find that I notice more and more feeling like a "minority" in crowds. And having so many people speak English with an accent -- and depending on where you travel, having a second language treated so equally. It seems that the most charitable response is acceptance -- but I sometimes worry about where it all will lead.

114:

ALL OF THE ABOVE. ("...the environment, the election, the economy, health, safety, society, your children's future...") I try to stay current via the various news cable shows (left & right!). There is always a news cable station on in the background or alerts on my computer. The coming election is very important as our country goes forward; hopefully, with the spirit and compromise and open-mindedness as our focus.

239:

I've been thinking what it means for Americans to blend ever since I read the comment on the IWD topic of What Matters to You Most. (from Member 31) Since I am a person who likes very much to cook -- I have to think of it as a metaphor. When we blend, is it more like a sauce -- when you really can't recognize the ingredients? Or more like a stew, where each retains some shape and flavor. I hope it's possible for us to live together while retaining our cultural identity. But it will take some effort.

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